something for st. jude

Self-Publish Tech Issue; Something for St. Jude; Weiner’s Snarky Director

Self-Publish Tech Issue; Something for St. Jude

The following tech issue that recently happened to me might not apply to new authors who are self-publishing, however, I think it’s important to mention for published authors who might be self-publishing back listed books. And, for those self-publishing more than one book at a time. There are some things you just can’t portend no matter how hard you try. And what happened to me late last night with Something for St. Jude is a good example of this. You may have heard me screaming at Amazon.

I’ve posted about how we’ve been re-releasing all my back listed stories and books from now defunct small e-press, Loveyoudivine.com. So it’s not really self-publishing in the sense that these books have already been through the publishing process from developmental editing, to covers, to copy editing. And in most cases, these stories have even been through more than that because many were trad published in anthologies that were released years ago by respected LGBT publishers like Cleis Press. They’ve gone through more than a few edits by excellent professional editors. I even left the original book covers, which I wanted to change, so readers would not get confused. So I thought I had nothing about which to worry.

Think again. Even though I’ve always been completely open and honest about all my product information…to the point of being a pain in the ass with blog posts like this, late last night I went to Amazon to check out Something for St. Jude and I noticed a review (a good review) that read, “False Advertising.” And since I don’t even advertise my books anywhere…or much of anything I write…I read the review a few times, bought the book myself, and figured out the issue.

Evidently, there was a tech issue during the upload where several short stories were added to the short e-book, Something for St. Jude. In other words, instead of getting the one short story for .99 as it had been described in the book blurb, the reader wound up getting Something for St. Jude, plus a few additional short stories for free. Of course when I get something for free by mistake, I say thank you and smile. But two readers were so upset they’d received all these short stories for free when they purchased the .99 e-book they left reviews about it. And I can’t thank them enough for leaving these reviews. This is truly the kind of feedback the world needs to see. If it hadn’t been for these reviewers mentioning this tech issue, I would never have known all these short e-books were being given away for free with a .99 short story.

Don’t get me wrong. I honestly don’t mind that people read the extra books for free and I hope that a few people enjoyed them. I’ve never been one to complain about these things, and my publishers often get frustrated with me because of this. But that’s because I do believe that when issues like this happen and someone benefits from it, good for them. To me it’s like going into the store, finding a mismarked item, and making the store honor the mistake. In fact, with all the e-book pirates out there pilfering my books, I’m kind of glad this mistake happened so readers who do pay and do things the honest way got a little surprise when they purchased SfSJ for .99 and found more than they’d expected. Good for them!

But, in the same respect, I felt awful about those poor readers who had received free e-books and didn’t want them. You can read the reviews here. I’ve left comments apologizing and thanking them for pointing this problem out to me. I still can’t thank them enough. And the problem has been fixed now, thanks to these dedicated Amazon reviewers, and Something for St. Jude is now one short story instead of five short stories for .99. As I said, had it not been for them I never would have known. And shame on me for not triple checking that. But as I said, there are some things you can’t predict no matter how hard you try. And when it comes to re-releasing back listed book issues, this might be one of them other authors should pay attention to. I’m still not completely certain how this happened. I checked all of the other books that were released around the same time and they seem to be fine.

I’d also like to add that if things like this ever come up and you need to contact me, my e-mail is public and I welcome all comments in private. I will respect your privacy and discretion is extremely important to me. rfieldj@aol.com

Weiner’s Snarky Director

It’s been established that Anthony Weiner is naughty. It’s been established he has a strong story. It’s been well established that other politicians can lie about anything and get away with it, from their book bio to their college records, but don’t do anything sexual in your personal life or your done.

And now it seems Weiner’s communications directer went batshit crazy about an article in NY Daily News where one of Weiner’s nasty little interns allegedly wrote a tell-all. According to this article, the intern claims Weiner had problems getting people to work on his staff. The only reason people were on Weiner’s staff were there to get closer to his wife and Hillary Clinton (Weiner’s wife works for Hillary). Basically, it sounds like the intern bashed all of them in a breach of confidence, including the communications director. And the communications directer, Barbara Morgan, went after the mouthy little intern without holding anything back. And it was very entertaining.

“It’s all bullshit,” Morgan tells TPM. “I mean, it’s such bullsh*t. She could f**king — f**king tw*t.” Oh.

Morgan goes on to say that Nuzzi is a “slutbag” and says “she sucked.” Also: “You know what? F**k you, you little c*nt. I’m not joking, I am going to sue her.”

In a statement this morning that was sent to reporters and available on The Washington Post, Morgan says, “In a moment of frustration, I used inappropriate language in what I thought was an off-the-record conversation. It was wrong and I am very sorry, which is what I said tonight when I called and emailed Olivia to apologize.”

My fifty cents: Sometimes you just have to get it all off your chest and let them have it.

Loveyoudivine Release: Something for St. Jude

We’re still in edits with my newest release from loveyoudivine.com. But I figured I’d share a few raw samples of the tag line, the blurb, and the excerpt that will be pubbed.

This is a short story, about 8,000 words. And I would consider it gay erotic romance because there is a tender story, with some back story about both characters as well. One is a cowboy, the other is a librarian.

Tag Line: Everyone has that one special moment he’ll never forget.

Blurb:
Jude Franklin lives a quiet conservative life in a small town in Wyoming. He’s head librarian, lives at home with his aging mother, and is terrified he’ll wind up like his spinster aunt…Poor Patty Ann. Though it’s too late for Jude to be considered a virgin, he doesn’t want to spend the rest of his life alone. The trouble is the one guy in town he’s attracted to is a handsome young library patron who also happens to work on a ranch on the edge of town. Only Jude knows he can’t have him, so he makes a drastic move and books a summer vacation on one of those gay cruise ships he’s read about millions of times. Little did he know love was waiting for him in the most unusual place, and he had to travel halfway around the world to figure it out.

Excerpt:

Jude Franklin went to church services on Sunday mornings and played the violin in a small chamber group every Thursday evening. He met with his fellow birdwatchers on the third Wednesday of every month at the community college, where he parked his Dodge beneath the same oak tree in visitor parking.

Though he was on the wrong side of thirty years old, he still lived at home with his aging mother, a frail slip of a woman who spent most of her time in a Bentwood rocker knitting things no one would ever use. His dark pine bed was the same twin sleeper he’d slept in since his tenth birthday, with the same dreary beige coverlet and doomed white sheets. Every now and then he’d replace a dog-eared copy of a gay porn magazine with the newer release. He kept them hidden between old childhood comic books in a hope chest that rested at the foot of the narrow bed. He knew he needed to learn how to navigate the Internet better so he wouldn’t have to deal with magazines. It was getting harder to find them.

He worked as a librarian in a small town in Wyoming. His shirts were white button downs and his bow-ties dark solids. His slacks were either brown or gray or navy, usually a heavy wool or tweedy material, and always pressed and creased to perfection with a sharp line down the front and back. He wore either black or brown oxfords with round toes and chunky heels; at the end of his small nose fell black eyeglass frames that were thick and dated. To say he stood out in a town filled with men wearing cowboy hats and boots would have been an understatement.

But more than all this, Jude was a soaring, handsome man, with a lean swimmer’s body and a head of golden hair. And even though his slacks were as dreary as pond waters, his firm round buttocks turned more than a few heads when he walked down the street. He had the kind of perfect ass that made even straight cowboys stop and glance when no one was looking.

All this furtive attention usually passed Jude by. He knew men and women were attracted to him, but he wasn’t attracted to them. The only guy in town that made his heart beat faster didn’t even know he existed. This young guy had no idea that Jude came unhinged just standing next to him.

His name was Ricky Lorne and he came into the library on a regular basis. This handsome voracious reader of mystery novels stopped by two or three times a week, usually when Jude was working out front. He always removed his cowboy hat when he came inside. He wiped his cowboy boots on a mat at the entrance to make sure he wouldn’t track any mud inside. Though Jude always became too flustered to speak at length in Ricky’s presence, he assumed that Ricky either stopped by on his way to work, or on his way home to return or check out his books. Jude had overheard one of the young female library volunteers once mention to a girlfriend that Ricky worked as a cowboy on a ranch on the outskirts of town, and then they whispered something and giggled. Jude glared at them, glanced down at their muffin tops, and sent them to the non-fiction shelves to sort by author.