Philly Gay Bashing Verdict

Christmas Book Giveaway; Verdict In Philly Gay Bashing; Coming Out as a Christian Evangelical; Homophobic Holiday Settings

Christmas Book Giveaway

My social media followers will wonder why I’m posting about this again. The reason is that the majority of my blog hits come from random google searches and not from within any book communities.

And I’m happy about that. I’m glad it happens. I’ve worked hard to separate my blogger identity from my author identity without changing my real name or identity, partly by always keeping this blog rated PG. It’s not always easy to keep that separate.

It’s interesting. Facebook gives me the least amount of hits.  Twitter is a little better. But most come from Google through people searching for LGBT information. And they always have.

So I’m re-posting the link to the Christmas book giveaway I’m doing this weekend for the people who will find out about it through a random search. And they come from all over the world.

Yesterday’s post should tell you all you need to know about the book giveaway, if you’re interested.

Verdict In Philly Gay Bashing Trial

The verdicts in the “Philly Gay Bashing” trial I’ve been following since last year are in and a lot of people are left wondering WTF happened there.

Of course the alleged gay bashing incident happened in Philadelphia, which is a very gay friendly city, but proves anything can still happen anywhere and no gay people are really safe.

After a series of contentious, “heated” deliberations, a Philadelphia jury returned a mixed verdict Friday in the assault trial of Kathryn Knott, finding the Bucks County woman guilty of simple assault and conspiracy to commit simple assault against Zachary Hesse, one of two victims beaten as they walked to get pizza in Center City on Sept. 11, 2014. 

Knott also was found guilty of reckless endangerment against both Hesse and his boyfriend, Andrew Haught, but acquitted of aggravated assault, a felony and the most serious charge against her.

You can read the rest here. I don’t want to comment on the trial at all because I do believe we have to respect the process no matter what the outcome. The deliberations are being described as “heated” and one juror said this:

Another juror, Gina Cook, described the process as “three days of fighting, vomiting and getting sick.”

Coming Out As a Christian Evangelical

A Christian researcher is claiming that it’s more difficult for an evangelical Christian to come out and admit it openly than it is for an LGBTI person.

“What I see here is that if you are a conservative Evangelical at a major law firm or at an Ivy League university, you have a much harder time coming out of the closet as a conservative Evangelical than you do coming out as a gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.

“That’s an empirical question but my experience at Princeton, and that was a decade ago, that it was much more of a contentious subject to say that you were opposed to same-sex marriage than to say that you were in favor of it.”

I actually can see his point. I would imagine it is difficult…in certain places. I just don’t think it’s more difficult. There is no place easy for a gay person to come out. I would imagine…sarcasm intended…there are still quite a few LGBTI people in university settings all over the world that still don’t feel comfortable coming out as gay. And so far I don’t think I’ve ever heard of  story where a teen got kicked out of his or her house because he or she was a Christian.

Someone should tell this guy the LGBTI community is not comprised of what he sees in the media.

You can read the rest here. 

Homophobic Holiday Settings

Comedian Sam Kalidi whom I love did another meme about what it’s like for gay people to have to suffer through the holiday season. I know it’s a serious topic and no one is laughing about it, but this is meant to be sarcasm.

We’ve asked online comedian, voice actor and chest hair model Sam Kalidi to create a comedic post each week for Queerty readers. This week he thinks about people who crawl back in the closet when visiting parents during the holidays. Sam looks forward to all your hate mail.You can find him on TwitterFacebook, Instagram and at your local glory hole.

You can check it out here.  

I think I’ve mentioned that for the first 15 years Tony and I were together we visited our families on the holidays separately because Tony’s family had no idea he was gay or that I even existed. Fifteen years. Things  are great now and I love his family like my own. But it’s never been easy for gay people when it comes to things like this, so we look for the humor in it.