Maine

George and Barbara Bush At Gay Wedding; Steve Jobs’ Home Historical Site

George and Barbara Bush At Gay Wedding

This past weekend former President George H.W. Bush and his wife, Barbara, served as witnesses at the wedding of two women, Bonnie Clement and Helen Thorgalson.

From ABC News:

Former President George H.W. Bush was an official witness at the same-sex wedding of two longtime friends, his spokesman said Wednesday.

Bush and his wife, Barbara Bush, attended the ceremony joining Bonnie Clement and Helen Thorgalsen as private citizens and friends on Saturday, spokesman Jim McGrath said.
 
Thorgalsen posted a photo on her Facebook page showing Bush signing the marriage license as a witness. She captioned the photo: “Getting our marriage license witnessed!”
 
The article goes on to explain more about how the Bush family feels about gay marriage, and how former Vice-President Cheney feels about it. It’s an interesting article for those who think politics is so black and white, without any gray areas. As things continue to move forward and more Republicans start supporting LGBT people, and more Republicans start coming out of the closet, my prediction is that it won’t be a Democrat or Republican issue in the future.  
 
Steve Jobs’ Home Historical Site
 
One of the things I often get into in my books whenever I set them in northern California is the architecture, especially the famed designs of Eichler. They weren’t grand by any standards, and yet there’s an artistic quality that marries form with function that’s become a staple in modern home design.
 
But this takes that magnificent architecture to a higher level now, especially because it’s finally being recognized as important. For a long time…most of my life…US architecture was only recognized as important if the likes George Washington slept there.
 
 
The family home where a young Steve Jobs built the first Apple computer may soon become a protected historical site.
 
The seven-member Los Altos Historical Commission has scheduled a “historic property evaluation” for the single-story, ranch-style house on Monday.
If the designation is ultimately approved, then the house on 2066 Crist Drive in Los Altos, California, will have to be preserved.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

First Gay Weddings in Maine…

In a history making event, the first same sex couples gathered in Maine to exchange vows this weekend. It’s significant in the sense that all these couples were finally allowed to have their relationships validated legally in Maine, and also because it’s one step closer to same sex marriage on a federal level.

There’s also an emotional factor here as well. And unless you’ve been in a long term same sex relationship and you’ve gone the proverbial distance, you can’t even begin to imagine how something like this works psychologically. You might think you can, but you really can’t know unless you’ve experienced not being allowed to legally marry. Being able to legally marry for gay couples is like they’ve finally stopped punishing you for that crime you never committed in the first place.

Arriving in a limo, Donna Galluzzo and Lisa Gorney had all the trappings of a traditional wedding: Rings, flowers, wedding vows, an entourage and a friend to officiate.

With tears in their eyes, they were among the first gay couples to exchange wedding vows early Saturday morning after Maine’s same-sex marriage law went into effect at midnight.

“We’re paving the way for people to go after us. I think it’s just amazing. It’s freeing. It’s what’s right,” an emotionally drained Gorney said after their ceremony in front of City Hall.

Of course here in Pennsylvania same sex couples aren’t allowed to get married, and the couples who were allowed to marry in Maine are still facing obstacles like inheritance taxes, benefits, and other legal issues because same sex marriage is not legal on a federal level. In an ironic twist, same sex couples who aren’t legally allowed to marry face injustices when it comes to divorce, too. (More to follow on the divorce issue soon.) In other words, to make this clear, if the couples who were married in Maine…or any other state where gay marriage is legal…come to visit Tony and me in Pennsylvania they would not be considered legally married. And that’s what “state by state” means in a general sense.

But at least it seems we’re moving forward. After the most recent elections in this country, I’ve stopped hoping that a President or one particular leader (and I use the term leader loosely) is going to do anything about recognizing same sex marriage federally. When it does happen (and it will) it’s going to have to be a collective effort that involves many people. And what happened in Maine this weekend is one more step in that direction.

You can read more here.

Photo: Falln-Stock Deviantart.com    (Huge thanks to photographer for taking such cool pics!)  



Let’s Give Maine a Strong Message…

I’ve never been a political activist. Actually, I’m far from being political at all. I write romance, which has nothing to do with politics. But after last week’s voting results in Maine, I can’t stop reading all the personal blog posts from the LGBT community. People were devastated. I know for a fact, after talking to friends in Maine, that LGBT residents of Maine were especially devastated.

So here’s a link that I think sends a strong message. http://aguyinlove.blogspot.com/

The link is from my friend Ryan’s blog. His partner, Kadin, wrote a smart post that I wish everyone would take very seriously.

How Do I Feel About Maine Today?

I’ve been writing (and reading) gay romance for a lot longer than m/m fiction has been considered a trendy thing to write. And I’m sure, without a doubt, that I’ll be writing it long after the trend has died down. When someone reads my books or my short stories, they are reading fiction that I have based on my own personal experiences as a gay man. I know discrimination on a personal level and I don’t have to go out and research it for a book. All I have to do it draw from my own personal experience and it’s there.

I also don’t have to go around the Internet today posting about how disappointed I am in Maine and leaving heartfelt comments on blog threads about how I wish the characters in my books weren’t so far away from realizing their dream of obtaining the same equal rights every American citizen has. I live the for the dream every single day of my life, and it is a given that I have always fought for, and always will fight for, the civil rights of gay Americans.

And while I’m extremely disappointed in Maine today. I’m not giving up hope yet, because I truly believe that there are just as many people who disagree with Maine as there are who agree with them. We just have to fight a little harder next time.