Justin Timberlake

Matt Bomer In Time; Foot Cream Kills HIV; Paid Reviews

Matt Bomer In Time

For those who’ve been disheartened by Matt Bomer not getting the part of Christian Grey in Fifty Shades of Grey, I recently came across the film, In Time, where Bomer plays an interesting character that basically sets the stage for the rest of the film.

It is the year 2169 and humanity had been genetically engineered to be born with a digital clock, bearing a year’s worth of time, on their forearm. At the age of 25 a person stops aging, but their clock begins counting down; when it reaches zero, that person “times out” and dies. Time has been turned into the universal currency; one can give time for products or services, as well as transfer it to others. The country is divided into time zones based on the wealth of its population. The film focuses on two time zones: Dayton is poor, with a populace that has learned indifference to the timed-out bodies on its streets; and New Greenwich, the wealthiest zone where inhabitants enjoy the benefits of their immortality and wealth, but are constantly surrounded by bodyguards and spend their time worried about accidental death.

You can read more here at Wiki.

I’m not the biggest fan of this genre, however, this film is excellent. The concept will make you stop and think about how you’ve always thought about time. And Bomer is great as always. His part is small, but you can’t stop thinking about what he did throughout the entire film. Of course Justin Timberlake holds his own, too. I feel a little guilty, as if I’m betraying the gay guy here, because I do like Matt Bomer. But Timberlake is the man of which all dreams are made.

Foot Cream Kills HIV

Whenever I see something like this I like to post about it because it creates a continued sense of hope that one day, hopefully in our lifetimes, there will be an end to HIV/AIDS. Now there’s evidence that a common foot cream might be beneficial to those with HIV.

In a study performed at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, not only does the drug Ciclopirox completely eradicate infectious HIV from cell cultures, but unlike today’s most cutting-edge antiviral treatments, the virus doesn’t bounce back when the drug is withheld. This means it may not require a lifetime of use to keep HIV at bay.

If this is accurate, it’s highly significant for anyone who is HIV positive and is now taking HIV meds. HIV is looked upon as a chronic illness, and in order to keep the virus at bay expensive drugs that have multiple side effects have to be taken daily. It’s a very difficult lifestyle that requires constant blood work and monitoring, not to mention discipline. And if they can come up with something to keep the virus at bay millions of lives will be vastly improved.

Paid Reviews

There are some very strong opinions on the web about authors paying for book reviews. And a few things I didn’t know…like google can penalize you if you get caught buying reviews for your books or any product you’re hocking to the public. This article covers all businesses on the web that depend on reviews. But from what I hear, it includes authors, too.

Google states that they have methods in place to automatically remove reviews that they believe may have violated their guidelines. They also pre-apologize because they know they might incorrectly remove some perfectly valid reviews.

I can just hear the free speech zealots harping on that one.

In this next article the blogger is adamant about authors who pay for reviews. Adamant to the point of stating it as bluntly as possible so there’s no misunderstanding.

Paying for reviews is stupid from a marketing perspective. As an author the only feedback you should care about is honest feedback. And you’ll never know if you’re getting honest feedback when you pay for that feedback. Even if you don’t insist on a positive review, not all reviewers going to tell you what they really think. They’re too afraid of how you’ll react or they’re afraid others won’t pay them for the same. There are ethical paid reviewers out there. But you’d be hard-pressed to tell the difference. And you can’t improve your product or your marketing strategy based on a bunch of bullshit.

I actually posted about this dude in August 2012. He started out with the best of intentions trying to market and promote authors. However, he found out there’s an easier way to make a buck.

Suddenly it hit him. Instead of trying to cajole others to review a client’s work, why not cut out the middleman and write the review himself? Then it would say exactly what the client wanted — that it was a terrific book. A shattering novel. A classic memoir. Will change your life. Lyrical and gripping, Stunning and compelling. Or words to that effect.
       

In the fall of 2010, Mr. Rutherford started a Web site, GettingBookReviews.com. At first, he advertised that he would review a book for $99. But some clients wanted a chorus proclaiming their excellence. So, for $499, Mr. Rutherford would do 20 online reviews. A few people needed a whole orchestra. For $999, he would do 50.
 
 
I don’t see the paid for book review issue disappearing. It’s part of our culture now, and unfortunately retail web sites promote the behavior. I just wish they would be a little more discreet about it, is all. I’ve discussed this with other authors I know in private and we all agree that when you see a book being released by a relatively unknown author and the very next day after the release that same relatively unknown author has over fifty five star reviews on Amazon something’s rotten in Denmark and it’s not the cheese. And no matter how many times they swear on their moms, dads, kids, and dead dogs, that they aren’t buying reviews, once the red flag is up there’s no turning back.
 
I’d like to see the FTC getting more involved.  
 
 
 
 
 


Lady Gaga’s Bare Butt; M/M Review: See the Light by Cassandra Carr

Lady Gaga’s Bare Butt

For those of you who might be interested, there’s a link to an entertaining GIF with Lady Gaga’s bare butt.

Still dressed the seashell bra and thong underwear from her “Applause” performance that opened the evening’s show, the singer flashed her bare butt on camera, which she was shaking to the sweet sounds of JT.

This happened at the MTV VMAs while Justin Timberlake came out on stage.  I didn’t watch…her butt or the VMAs.

As a side note, while I’m sure there are a few people interested in seeing Lady Gaga’s bare ass, I think most of us would rather see Justin Timberlake’s.

M/M Book Review: See the Light by Cassandra Carr

One of the reasons I don’t write book reviews often is because they take so long to write. So I’ve decided to post a few mini reviews every now and then. This one is about a book I read over the weekend titled, See the Light by Cassandra Carr. The book is considered M/M, it’s the only book I’ve ever read by this author, and you can find it here.

The main theme of the book revolves around two closeted hockey players, Jason and Patrick. While I do like M/M books with jock themes, I’m not always a fan of any book that talks about the sport more than the love story. In See the Light, I was not disappointed. The author mentioned enough about hockey as a sport to keep me involved in a plot that was about hockey, but didn’t bore me with too many hockey details that would have been irrelevant to the love story. I also found the way Carr handled the relationships and interactions between the hockey players to be short and sweet, but at the same time extremely real. In other words, closeted gay hockey players put up an invisible wall to keep themselves protected. Their lives depend on this. As a gay man I fully understand this, and Carr did a great job at portraying what it must really be like for closeted gay hockey players. Nothing seemed fake.

I also enjoyed the awkward way the two characters come together in the beginning, which is really about as awkward as these things get in real life for most gay men. I kept thinking as I was reading that these are really many of the things I’ve experienced as a gay man, which kept me turning each page to see what would happen next. The topic of top and bottom was also a part of the book, which I don’t see as often as I would like in M/M romances. This top and bottom issue, for lack of a better way to put it, is something so fundamentally important to any intimate gay relationship it can either make or break a gay couple on the first date. And, the top and bottom issue has nothing to do with gender power or politics. It’s something innate to gay men sexually speaking and has nothing to do with how they behave when they are not in intimate situations. Carr scored highly here, too.

This book is also erotic romance. And the erotic scenes were not only excellent, but real. I found them sexy, well executed from a tech POV, and superior in detail with an individual style. And I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the way Carr wrote about Jason and Patrick acting as if they were sex maniacs at some points in the story. They do act that way, and any gay man knows why. Gay men don’t get a normal puberty like straight men. We are denied that and when we finally reach an age (that age varies with all gay men) where we realize we can act on our human sexual desires, we tend to over dramatize them both internally and externally to a certain extent. Half the time, just like the characters in this book I’m reviewing, we don’t even realize we are doing this.

The writing style of this book was neat and tight, without most of the usual issues I find horrifying in so many romance novels, gay or straight. The dialogue tags did not make me cringe, and the dialogue constantly moved the story forward. The only thing I noticed were a few too many similes, however, I’m not one of those readers who shun all similes. I “like” them and I don’t think they take the reader away from the story in this case at all. In fact, they add to the story in most cases. 

The ending was a little ambiguous, but the author has posted on Amazon that she will be writing a sequel to this book to tie things up. I don’t mind that. I like cliff hangers and I like knowing that I have something to which I can look forward. 

If I post this review on Amazon or Goodreads, I’ll give it five stars. If I were presumptuous enough to ever grade an author, I would give this book an A+. And I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in fiction that shows what it’s really like to be gay and closeted in a very straight, often unforgiving, world.