journalistic porn

Bonnie Goldstein vs Levi Johnston: Since When is Playgirl Magazine Considered Porn?

I just read an interesting piece, written by Bonnie Goldstein, of Politics Daily, about Levi Johnston. She claims that by posing for Playgirl Magazine, Levi has now fallen from respectable society and entered into the dark, multi-million dollar porn industry.

Wow! Bonnie. PORN?

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not a fan of Levi Johnston. I think he could have played his cards differently. If I had been him, I would have. But this post isn’t about Levi or Palin or what’s been going on between them. This post is about Bonnie Goldstein referring to Playgirl Magazine as “porn.”

Last time I checked, Playgirl, according to wikipedia, is described as, “The magazine was founded in 1973 during the height of the feminist movement as a response to erotic men’s magazines such as Playboy and Penthouse that featured similar photos of women.” I see the word “erotic” all over the web when I google Playgirl. But I’ve never seen it referred to as porn, on a professional level. Amateurs can think what they want. But there are rules within the industry that define these things. Bonnie Goldstein knows this.

And as far as I know, Levi didn’t even pose for full frontal nudity. So what makes his photos porn? And, Bonnie didn’t forget to put in links show Levi’s Playgirl photos. If she was so against the “porn” photos, you’d think she would have left out the links so she wouldn’t offend her readers.

I’m sensitive about this issue because I write erotica and erotic romance. And there is a difference between porn and erotica. Porn is just sex for the sake of sex. There’s no story and there are no layers of emotion. And erotica is an actual story, where the sex moves the story and the romance forward, and there should be many layers of emotion. And if you remove the sex from erotica, the story should be able to stand on its own.

I also know there is such a thing as “journalistic porn.” And that’s what Bonnie Goldstein’s piece is: absolute journalistic porn. If she didn’t like what Levi Johnston did in Playgirl, she could have written the piece differently to get her point across without calling Playgirl Magazine porn. But then she wouldn’t have gotten anyone riled up over it. And this, I am certain, was her intention. It’s very transparent. Writers like Bonnie Goldstein are only interested in getting attention. They write misinformed pieces for innocent people who don’t know the difference. And they get away with it.