John Waters On Divine; Gaydar Is NOT Real

John Waters On Divine; Gaydar Is NOT Real, They Say; Ditching Masc and Femme Labels

John Waters On Divine

I remember the first time I discovered something gay related that could be discussed aloud in mainstream public. It was still camp and gay culture, but from what I remember it crossed into the mainstream, and it was safe. It was Divine. People could discuss Divine anywhere, and joke around about her. As a gay teen who was in the closet, that made a huge difference to me. I didn’t feel so isolated and I realized there was a lot more to the world than what I’d learned in Catholic school.

So I find anything about Divine fascinating…

Divine’s role as a cray cray mass murderer who meets a violent end is at the heart of John Waters’ early camp classic Multiple Maniacs, which a whole new generation can enjoy in restored glory thanks to Criterion Collection. That is just one highlight of this edition of What To Watch, our biweekly guide of theatrical and home entertainment releases.

Here’s the rest.

Gaydar Is NOT Real, They Say

Here’s an interesting study about whether or not gaydar is accurate.

Basically, Cox says, the whole idea of gaydar is bologna. Really, people are just relying on deeply-engrained stereotypes to make assumptions about strangers. This isn’t good because, as most people would agree, stereotypes often have negative consequences.

The rest is here. You don’t want to miss the comments. To be honest, as much as I hate to admit this, I’ve never had the best gaydar. I’m usually wrong about 50% of the time, if not more.

Ditching Masc and Femme Labels

Here’s an article that discusses whether or not we should all just stop using labels like masc and femme.

“How many gay men like me have spent countless hours worrying about the tone of our voices, the sway of our hips, the limpness of our wrists, lying in fear of being discovered for the ‘girl’ within us that we’ve been so desperately trying to suppress?” he asks.

This way of thinking, Pike says, isn’t healthy, as it causes people to “[mask] their authenticity, their voice or their true desires.” 

There’s more here. Like most of you out there I’ve been conditioned to think and react to labels, especially in gay culture. I don’t think there is a gay man alive who hasn’t questioned the way he speaks or the way he acts. This is all buried so deeply in our culture I’m not sure we can rid ourselves of labels…but I definitely think it’s worth a try.