inaccuracy on the web

When I Say Take Blog Posts with a Grain of Salt, This is What I Mean…

I’m not saying the information on the amateur blog I’m talking about isn’t completely accurate. And I’m not mentioning the blogger because I think he means well…he just doesn’t fact check. I don’t know anything about Stephen King or J.K. Rowling’s rejection records, nor do I care to know about them. For all I do know, this part of the post is spot on.

But I have been following a few books on the NYT bestseller list, and I do question this information:

The New York Times doesn’t say exactly how they determine the books on their best seller lists, but they will tell you that they don’t collect data on Internet sales (no Amazon! Which explains why Amanda Hocking isn’t on it.)

As far as I know, there is a wonderful self-published romance out that’s not only on the NYT bestseller list, but most of the sales did, indeed, come from the Internet. It’s a.99 amazon kindle book. Where else could the sales come from?

I’ve posted about how hard it is to find information about how they collect data for the NYT bestseller list.

There are a few other comments in the blog post I’m talking about I could question, too. But they don’t matter. The point is that you should never take these blog posts seriously unless you know it’s coming from an accurate source. And this includes me. I try to get it right. I try to check the facts. But I could be wrong, too.