gay TV

Queer Eye For the Straight Guy?? One Million Moms Go After Yogurt; Rainbow Detective Series Box Set on Amazon

Queer Eye For the Straight Guy??

Ted Allen, from TV’s Queer Eye For the Straight Guy, made a few comments about how he thinks the TV show helped change a generation of TV viewers. I’ll comment below, but read it all, not just the first part.

“When we made Queer Eye, we never saw ourselves as important or as activists. We were proud of being out. We were the first television show, that I know of, that had an entirely openly gay cast… I’ll never forget the first time I watched Matt Lauer try to say the word ‘queer’ on TV. I mean, it’s not a word people threw around a lot, and it was a very political word. I didn’t like the title at the beginning. I’ve come to realize I was wrong, because I think the provocative nature of it was balanced with the sweetness of the way the show ran most of the time. It worked out… The main thing about Queer Eye that I will say is that, in an era before the Internet was everywhere, we heard from hundreds, probably thousands, of gay kids who said, ‘Thank you for putting some gay people on TV that my parents can actually like. Firefighters liked us, cops, marines. I mean, it was a very good show.”

I actually do remember, and I remember it very well, the first time I watched Queer Eye For the Straight Guy. At first, I was excited/eager because it was a gay TV show, with gay people. There was nothing else gay on TV. Then I watched one episode and that was enough for me…and for Tony. We just looked at each other and shook our heads. When we mentioned the show to friends after that, our friends basically felt the same way we did. That’s because there was nothing at all to which we, as gay men, could relate.

However, I’m not knocking the show. I think it did help push gay people forward in its own limited way. And when you look at something collectively that way, that’s never a bad thing. I’m also sure there were many gay men who could relate to the show, and there’s nothing wrong with that either. So it did have an impact on gay and pop culture in some ways. 

As you would imagine, the comments are mixed, which shows just how diverse gay men can be. That’s the thing I’m always hoping people “get.” Not all of us care about fashion, fabrics, and accessories. Many of us care more about cars and baseball.  

The rest is here. 

One Million Moms Go After…Yogurt!!

The title is pretty self-explanatory. The anti-gay crusaders known as One Million Moms are now going after a yogurt company because the yogurt company featured lesbians in an advertisement. Lesbians in a bed, wearing wedding rings.

Within moments, that spectral organization known as One Million Moms rose up from the gulley in which it sleeps, instantaneously firing out a nutso press release that reads in part: “Chobani should be ashamed of their latest commercial for attempting to normalize sin by featuring two women naked in bed together… This commercial not only promotes same sex relationships by including two lesbians, but also same-sex marriage because the two women wear matching wedding bands.”

You can read the rest here. The comments are worth checking out here, too. I just wish they wouldn’t use ableist language so often…words like “nutso.” That’s wrong and I don’t think I’m being too PC about that. We don’t snark that way about cancer or any other illness and we shouldn’t be doing it to people who have emotional illnesses.

Someone in the comments also mentions that the “One Million” part of this group of moms isn’t accurate. I don’t know that for certain, though.

The Rainbow Detective Agency 


Box Set Series $5.99


Why One Gay Couple Hates "The New Normal"

I’ve posted several times about how I like “The New Normal.” I can identity with most of it, which is one of the reasons why I like it so much. I thought I would be in the majority on this, but last night I found out I was wrong.

Tony and I have two very good old friends, a gay couple who have been together since 1975. They were only in their very early twenties when they met, so they aren’t that old now. One is a retired English professor and the other has been working in publishing since the 1970’s. We don’t see them that often anymore because they live between NY, Key West, and New Hope.

We started a tradition about fifteen years ago where a group of us would get together and celebrate individual birthdays at different times of the year. The birthday group started out with about fifteen people, and now it’s dwindled down to just the four of us. Some moved; some passed away. Tony and I were always the youngest in that particular group and we’ve made a lot of new friends since. But it’s nice to get together with old friends you don’t see often. In this case, it’s like family. As a side note, when Tony was hospitalized in 2007, near death, with pneumonia, these were two of the very close friends who were there when I needed them. You’d be amazed at how you learn who your true friends are during a time of crisis. A lot of people disappear, which you tend not to forget.

In any event, we started talking about gay fiction first. My friend in publishing is always amazed at how straight women have embraced gay fiction in the past few years. He’s more concentrated in non-fiction and mainstream fiction, so anything LGBT oriented is a novelty to him. Then the conversation moved on to LGBT TV shows and I mentioned how much I love watching “The New Normal.” Both my friends looked at each other and made faces, and then they went into long individual reasons why they don’t like “The New Normal” at all.

While they spoke, Tony and I just listened because we both like the show. They seemed to think it’s just more stereotypical nonsense that doesn’t depict the way real gay male couples live. Again, we just listened without speaking. I found their POV interesting, not offensive. They were especially annoyed…the the point of frustration…with respect to all the talk about gay men having kids on “The New Normal.” And it’s not the first time I’ve heard this. Many older gay couples don’t want kids, never wanted kids, and can’t seem to understand why any other gay couples would want them. In fact, in this case, this older gay couple can’t stand kids in general and they will proudly state this to your face. I’m not exaggerating either.

I tend to think this is generational, and for a myriad of reasons I won’t get into in one short blog post. But it wasn’t just the “kid” aspect of “The New Normal” they didn’t like. They thought one of the main characters (can’t remember his name) was far too effeminate…which is also why they refuse to watch “Modern Family.” And, this part blew me away. My friends thought the gay bar scene in the first episode of “The New Normal” was totally fake. For those who didn’t see this scene, it’s basically centered around the two characters going to a bar, sitting there bored, and acting as if they are too old to be out in a gay bar. My friends thought it was a cliched spin on straight married couples, and they don’t identify with straight married couples…at all, not ever. They also thought this was completely unrealistic, especially since my friends are much older and they still enjoy going out to gay bars.

We eventually moved on to other topics, but I couldn’t help thinking about how different their reaction was to our reaction to “The New Normal.” Again, I think it’s generational. It was also difficult to argue the points they were making because I knew deep down they weren’t completely wrong. But it really is all debatable. The only reason I’m saying this is because Tony and I have thought about adopting a child more than once. And, Tony and I have been in that bar scene ourselves that was depicted on the TV show and we were both bored to death and we are only in our early forties. So I guess it’s hard to please everyone, especially in a community where people are all so very different. I’m also starting to wonder if it will ever be possible to please all gay people at the same time with anything. It will be interesting to see how “The New Normal” moves forward with future episodes. I’m going to be watching closely just to see if I feel the same way in the future as I do now.

A New "Homa-Sexshul" TV Show: The New Normal


When I tuned into the newest TV show revolving around gay characters last night I wasn’t expecting much. To be completely honest, I’ve come to expect the typical, like the gay couple on Modern Family or a character who is some middle aged divorced woman’s best gay friend. Nothing wrong with either of these examples if done well, but it does seem to me that the mainstream public loves to watch limp-wristed gay men lisp and flit nowadays as much as they used to enjoy watching that hideous old stereotype where people of African descent tap dance in Shirley Temple movies.

Maybe were are evolving, because I finally felt as if I could relate to the characters in The New Normal last night. There seemed to be a balance this time I don’t see often. It’s usually all about the dark depressing emo types or Perez Hilton types. But the gay couple on which TNN revolves around were examples of gay couples I know in real life, and gay couples to which I could relate. And after a lifetime of not seeing anything like this, it’s nice to be indulged for a change.

From Wiki:

Bryan (Andrew Rannells) and David (Justin Bartha) are a happy Los Angeles couple, with successful careers. The only thing missing in their relationship is a baby. They meet Goldie (Georgia King), a single mother and waitress from the Midwest, who has moved to L.A. with
her eight-year-old daughter Shania (Bebe Wood). Jane (Ellen Barkin), Goldie’s grandmother, follows her family to the city against her grandaughter’s wishes. Goldie decides to become
Bryan and David’s surrogate, and naturally, her family gets involved..[5]

I know it sounds as if it’s stereotypical from this blurb. They live in LA, they have successful careers, blah, blah, blah. But I have to admit that there was a normal balance between them. One is a doctor and no one would even know he’s gay just by looking at him. The other is clearly gay and makes no apologies for it. It’s not only a good example of how opposites do attract in real life and in fiction, but also a good example of how gay couples find this balance and don’t even know it sometimes. In almost every single successful gay relationship I’ve ever seen, this balance is always there. In other words, you won’t see a relationship with two bottoms last very long unless they’ve become codependent on each other and it’s to late to change…that I have seen more than once.

There’s even a little kid who mimics “Little Edie” from Grey Gardens. And she does a great job. When she says, “Mother darling,” you’d swear the real Edie Beale was in the room.

It’s funny, too. The scene where they go out to a bar to recapture their youths was not only real, it’s a great example of how different established gay couples are from the single gay people we see all the time. And again, it’s nice to see a difference.

If you haven’t seen or heard about The New Normal, you can find out more about it here at the NBC web site. There’s a clip and more than a few photos.

I only hope the writers keep the characters and the storyline flowing the way it is now. I’ve seen shows like this start out with great potential and then slip into the same old gay guy on Sex and the City pattern. What I would really find seriously interesting would be to see the writers actually write in a gay character who isn’t a left wing liberal Democrat like so many gay men I know. Now that would truly be a novelty we’ve never seen before.