gay movies

Sex With Mystery Species; Judi Dench Says Gay; Queer Fanart; Coca Cola No Gay Support

Sex With Mystery Species

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:T.O.P_as_depicted_in_fan_art..jpg

Sex with mystery species is not one of those taboo topics that get banned by Kobo censors, and it’s not a review of James Franco’s new novel either. It’s actually about something far more interesting, and serious.

The ancient genomes, one from a Neanderthal and one from a different archaic human group, the Denisovans, were presented on 18 November at a meeting at the Royal Society in London. They suggest that interbreeding went on between the members of several ancient human-like groups living in Europe and Asia more than 30,000 years ago, including an as-yet unknown human ancestor from Asia.

You can read more here. It actually suggests there could have been a new population of humans, thanks to interbreeding between Denisovans and some other population, creating something that’s neither human nor Neanderthal.

Judi Dench Says Gay

There’s a new film starring Judi Dench titled, Philomena. The plot revolves around a woman who gave up her son for adoption during a time when women weren’t supposed to have children out of wedlock and she finds the child as an adult years later and discovers he’s gay.

“You haven’t lived until you’ve seen Dench saying that she knew her son was gay, ‘but I just wondered if he might be bicurious.’ She also freely utters the terms ‘gay homosexual’ and ‘beard’ and says she’s fully aware that some guys don’t like to use condoms because it doesn’t feel as good. This is one instinctually savvy lady, one who seems to know most of the answers, even as she’s desperately looking for them. And she makes mention of her clitoris, too!”

You can read more here. For some reason I don’t get they seem to find it interesting when Judi Dench says the words “homosexual” and “beard.”

Queer Fan Art

Much like fanfic in publishing, the art world has something called fan art.

Fan art or fanart are artworks created by fans of a work of fiction (generally visual media such as comics, movies, television shows or video games) and derived from a character or other aspect of that work. As fan labor, fan art refers to artworks that are neither created nor (normally) commissioned or endorsed by the creators of the work from which the fan art derives.

If you follow this link you can check out a few examples of fanart of The Hunger Games. I’m not sure it would be legal to post them here. Even though the creators of the works are using someone else’s concept, I think it’s still their copyright. Some are actually very good. The one above I found at wiki commons. Click photo for attribution.

Coca-Cola No Gay Support

One of the biggest sponsors of the Sochi games in Russia is Coca-Cola. Allegedly, CC had indicated it won’t be taking a stand against the discrimination and abuse that’s been going on in Russia. And gay activists have plans of their own.

Gay rights campaigners are now planning to de-rail Coca-Cola’s marketing plan at the Olympics if they don’t change their mind, with a major publicity counter-offensive.

Digital activism group All Out has been demanding Coca-Cola should speak out against Russia’s anti-gay laws, using their Olympics sponsorship as a platform.

At a time when so many are learning about good nutrition and rethinking their overall eating habits, you’d think Coca-Cola would give this some more thought. I can live without Coke.

You can read more here.

Side note: I’ve been seeing LGBTI all over the place lately and didn’t know what the “I” stood for until I looked it up. According to this, it means “Intersex.” And what is intersex you ask? Intersex is another term for hermaphrodite. So far, I haven’t adopted the “Q,” as in LGBTQ, they were all trying to push down our throats for a while there. And that’s just because I don’t like the word Queer. To me, Queer is the equivalent of the N word. However, I’m fine with the “I” and I think this might have a chance to catch on. I might even start using it myself.

Gay Films 2012; Michael Hastings’ Death Report; Gay Mormon Sex Positions




Gay Films 2012

There’s something new called Studio Responsibility Index, where GLAAD is now tracking six major film studios to see how many of them focused on LGBT content. This is the first published account of what’s supposed to become an annual event.

 Out of the 101 film releases by the major studios in the 2012 calendar year, only 14 films contained characters identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual. There were no films containing transgender characters. More detailed looks at each studio and their films can be found in the report.

What I find interesting about all this is that Hollywood is no stranger to the LGBT community, and I think it’s safe to say that Hollywood is also filled with closeted gay people who are terrified of coming out because of their careers. Those who are out, deal with all kinds of backlash…Matt Bomer. And yet, at the same time, Hollywood is always the first to jump on to the bandwagon of anything politically correct, especially when they see a chance to make money on us.

It’s an interesting pattern of both deception and hypocrisy. Susan Sarandon the ultra liberal of them all stars in a film where they use yellowface. That’s hypocrisy. Tired old Jane Fonda crawls out from under her rock after years and years and she winds up playing Nancy Reagan in a film about an African American so Hollywood can fill the quota in that minority department (and Oprah can win an Oscar). That’s deception. Good old Hanoi Jane knew exactly what SHE was doing. Orpah does, too. And they smile all the way to the bank from the red carpet and we are expected to buy into it. Unfortunately, many of us do.  

These reasons are also why I’ve parodied films like Pretty Woman and An Officer and a Gentleman in gay erotic fiction. We (gay people) like to read and see gay romantic content, too. And not always the depressing literary brand of gay content we’ve seen in the past. Sometimes we just want something that’s fun, and that could even include heteronormative content. Many of us want to be included in heteronormative situations. As a gay man who has experienced this lack of LGBT content all my life I felt justified in doing this with my parodies of hetero films…in spite of what some reviewers thought (or expected). There are other reasons as well. I rarely do anything by accident.

In any event, you can read more here, where there’s a link to a detailed example of the report on film studios and LGBT content.

As a side note, I don’t think anyone is really all that surprised by any of this. Hollywood doesn’t just do this with gays, it does it with all minorities. They throw us all a bone once in a while, but for the most part our overall society is not represented well…I’m talking about the real world where we all live with LGBT people and other minorities. What we get for the most part are white, heteronormative films, and that could be part of the reason why box office sales were so low this summer.

I’ve been on the fence about crowdfunding sources that seem to be popping up all over these days. But I’m only against them when people like Spike Lee and other established Hollywood types hock people for money. If I see someone who is doing something different, has never been part of traditional Hollywood, and wants to promote anything LGBT in an indie film, I can’t wait to support them. I only hope this catches on and the indies start to bury the established studios.

Michael Hastings’ Death Report

I think this was probably one of the saddest things I read this year so far. I posted about the untimely death of journalist Michael Hastings in June, and at the time there were speculations of foul play, and even a possible conspiracy theory. But so far all that’s been ruled out.

The coroners who examined him found “traces of amphetamine in his system, consistent with possible intake of methamphetamine many hours before death, as well as marijuana,” the Times wrote. “Neither were considered a factor in the crash, according to toxicology reports.”

You can read more here, with links to detailed sources.

It’s always sad to see someone with that kind of talent taken away too soon.

Gay Mormon Sex Positions

On a lighter note, someone’s come up with an unusual picture book. The pictures are unique because they show gay Mormon men in various erotic positions.

Photographer Neil Dacosta and art director Sara Phillips are part of the team behind the photos of the two male missionaries in various sexual positions. When asked about the project, Dacosta told The Huffington Post, “This project means a few different things to everyone involved, but the overall goal is to start a discussion, using a visual medium, about equal rights and the separation of church and state.” The photographer says the goal was to “leave our description fairly open-ended” in hopes “that viewers will find their own personal meanings within the series.”

I think the important thing to make clear here is that no one from the LGBT community ever targeted or attacked a Mormon, at least not as far as I know. And personally I think they have every right to practice whatever they want, and to believe whatever they want, as long as they do it on their own terms and they keep it to themselves. In other words, don’t tell me how to live or what to believe. And if you do I’m going to strike back and show you that’s not how it works in life. Especially in a country where church and state are separate.

I don’t think I have to go into details about how the Mormon Church feels about gays.

You can read more here, where you’ll see some highly amusing photos. How I wish I could just paste one to this post!!

The photo above has been released in the public domain, here.


Gay Film Review: "Is It Just Me?"

I have to admit that I didn’t go looking for the DVD of “Is It Just Me,” I won it in a GayRomLit event this past October and finally made time to watch it last night. I honestly don’t get more than an hour or two to watch TV, and when I do it’s usually something I’m catching up on with DVR.

As anyone can imagine, the reviews for IIJM are about as diverse as any reviews out there for gay romance, and though I don’t review films often, I did want to take the time to review this one simply because I’m always harping about how TV and Hollywood usually get it wrong with gay content. In this case, with IIJM, I have admit that although I found flaws throughout the film, I actually liked/loved it and I thought it represented a few different kinds of gay men…which I don’t see often. But before you get too excited, I’m also going to be honest about it. Just keep in mind that I did like it…even if I get a little snarky.

The basic storyline revolves around Blaine, a very normal, average nice-looking young gay man who is more interested in finding love than sex. The flaw with this is that most young gay men are looking for love and the right guy to marry. But they are also having fun while they are looking, and Blaine just seemed too backward to me…and without a viable explanation. Especially because Blaine was so nice-looking, so smart, and without major flaws. But I suppose that can happen and I could be expecting too much. It’s just that I know a lot of nice-looking normal gay men in their twenties and they aren’t sitting around complaining about not having any fun. Most are having too much fun to complain. Now, had they really come up with a character who had a few fundamental flaws, and wasn’t all that normal, I would have loved Blaine a lot more. But it’s hard to listen to someone cry poor mouth while he’s carrying two loaves of bread under each arm, so to speak.

Then Blaine meets Zander at a coffee shop somewhere in LA, and Zander does something very nice for him. A nice touch, I’ll admit. I’m a sucker those little things thrown into plots. A short time after they meet, they wind up chatting online and have no idea they’ve actually met in person at the coffee shop. Another nice touch. I like kismet, too. While all this online chatting is going on, Blaine has no idea that his extremely humpy male stripper roommate has hijacked his account and Zander is actually speaking to Blaine thinking it’s the male stripper roommate, Cameron, because of the profile pic. So Zander is getting interested in Blaine while chatting, and thinking Blaine is actually looks like hot sexy male stripper Cameron. However, keep in mind that it’s not as though Blaine is flawed in any way.

The chatting leads to a phone call. And that night Blaine and Zander wind up speaking on the phone for so long Blaine’s twelve inch candle burns down to nothing. I don’t think that’s symbolic at all; I don’t think the people who wrote this film would even get this. But I have to admit that one of my all time favorite scenes in a film was with Orlando Bloom in “Elizabethtown” where he spends hours…days…speaking on the phone with Kirsten Dunst before he actually meets her again. I think that’s love and romance at its finest. I’m not joking either. I’ve watched that film so many times I could repeat the dialogue, and my favorite part is when they get to know each other on the phone. Dunst is just perfect, and she’s exactly what Bloom needs to move forward with his life. I couldn’t say the same about Blaine and Zander.

It’s different in “It’s Just Me.” You don’t actually get to hear much of the phone conversation they share, and they also wind up having phone sex before they actually meet. That didn’t happen in “Elizabethtown.” Now I have nothing against phone sex. And I’m no prude. But if I were looking to really get to know someone on a personal emotional level, and possibly fall in love with him, I wouldn’t be having phone sex with him that soon. It would be too creepy. There’s a line between sex for sex and falling in love sex, and phone sex at that stage of the game doesn’t work. I was actually hoping they wouldn’t do it while I watched, but they did. As a side note, there were no nude scenes or any significant erotic scenes to mention at all in this film. So don’t get too excited about that if you’re into phone sex. You’re going to be disappointed. There’s nothing sexy at all about this movie, and I don’t think they were trying to go for that either. So that wasn’t an issue for me, but it might be for others.

When Zander finally sends Blaine his digital photo, Blaine is thrilled to see that the man he’s been communicating with his nice looking. He’s actually thrilled, which made me wonder about how sincere he is about not caring too much about looks and superficial things. But then Blaine finds out that Zander thinks he’s been communicating with Cameron (sexy male stripper) because of the profile pic, and Blaine panics. This turns into a classic Hollywood farce where Cameron pretends to be Blaine when he meets Zander for the first time. It’s very Cyrano de BerGerac in a modern day gay situation.

The only problem is that Cameron is not as deep, smart, or thoughtful as Blaine. He’s basically a decent guy who makes money stripping, and he’s trying to break into films by taking on roles in cheesy horror movies. It’s interesting how they trash the horror movies in this film, too. They make jokes about Cameron’s films as if they are creating Oscar worthy viewing. I’m really not being snarky here; just honest. And that’s because the ultimate plot fail is that Zander meets this decent but shallow guy, Cameron, thinking he’s really Blaine, and never questions it. Zander doesn’t even question the fact that they have different voices after he’s already spoken to him on the phone. Which led me to believe that Zander was just another blithering idiot and Blaine’s better off without him. Had I been writing that film, that’s what I would have done and Blaine would have found true love somewhere else…anywhere else for that matter. Had I been Blaine in real life, I would have blocked Zander from all social media at once.

But I digress. As the ridiculous farce continues, different characters are shoved into the plot in slightly stereotypical ways. Zander’s living/renting (it’s never explained) with an older gay man who is the most depressing sad sack I’ve seen in years. He bakes cupcakes and says things like, “My story’s too sad to tell,” with a Joan Crawford swoon and a Bette Davis lilt in his voice. But even that’s a little exaggerated because we never really learn anything about the older guy’s past. His past just sucked. And he’s always there to offer his wisdom to poor Zander…who comes home and takes off his shirt the minute he walks through the door. I don’t know where they come up with that stuff, because any young gay man who takes off his shirt that way in front of an older gay man wants attention. Plain and simple. And who takes off his shirt the minute he comes home anyway? But we’re led to believe that Zander is just an unassuming simple gay man from Texas who would never worked an older gay man for sex or money in his life. He just an innocent kind of guy with a cute Texas accent. But he still strips down, and the older guy’s tongue hangs out. The Texas stereotype didn’t sit well with me either. I often think these LA and NY movie types assume we all just hopped off the turnip truck, with a guitar, a cowboy hat, and a simple dream.

Another character that’s slightly stereotypical is Blaine’s “girlfriend.” She’s so insignificant to the plot I don’t even remember her name. She’s really Blaine’s fag hag, she’s there to offer him advice on love and relationships, and she’s just a bunch of pithy sarcastic fun.

I’m not going to get into anything else because I don’t want this review to have any spoilers. Not that it matters much because the plot is basically the same thing I’ve seen before in so many other gay themed movies. In fact, I watched this with Tony and we had it figured out within the first half hour and we were right.

But that doesn’t mean I’m not going to recommend this film. I actually did enjoy it in spite of all the issues above. You just can’t take it seriously; I don’t think it was intended to be taken seriously. And that’s the spirit with which it should be viewed. There’s nothing better than a campy gay movie that doesn’t always make sense. One where you love to hate the characters. And truly best of all,  the most unlikely character, the careless male stripper roommate, Cameron, turns out to be the smartest, the coolest, and the only person in a sea of virtual WTF-ery I’d want to get to know in real life.

If I had to rate this on a five star scale, I’d have to give it four stars just because it’s so entertaining in a campy way. The acting was good, too. And even though there were so many plot failures, I think it did touch on a few relevant issues that younger gay men are experiencing right now.

Gay Film Review: "Is It Just Me?"

I have to admit that I didn’t go looking for the DVD of “Is It Just Me,” I won it in a GayRomLit event this past October and finally made time to watch it last night. I honestly don’t get more than an hour or two to watch TV, and when I do it’s usually something I’m catching up on with DVR.

As anyone can imagine, the reviews for IIJM are about as diverse as any reviews out there for gay romance, and though I don’t review films often, I did want to take the time to review this one simply because I’m always harping about how TV and Hollywood usually get it wrong with gay content. In this case, with IIJM, I have admit that although I found flaws throughout the film, I actually liked/loved it and I thought it represented a few different kinds of gay men…which I don’t see often. But before you get too excited, I’m also going to be honest about it. Just keep in mind that I did like it…even if I get a little snarky.

The basic storyline revolves around Blaine, a very normal, average nice-looking young gay man who is more interested in finding love than sex. The flaw with this is that most young gay men are looking for love and the right guy to marry. But they are also having fun while they are looking, and Blaine just seemed too backward to me…and without a viable explanation. Especially because Blaine was so nice-looking, so smart, and without major flaws. But I suppose that can happen and I could be expecting too much. It’s just that I know a lot of nice-looking normal gay men in their twenties and they aren’t sitting around complaining about not having any fun. Most are having too much fun to complain. Now, had they really come up with a character who had a few fundamental flaws, and wasn’t all that normal, I would have loved Blaine a lot more. But it’s hard to listen to someone cry poor mouth while he’s carrying two loaves of bread under each arm, so to speak.

Then Blaine meets Zander at a coffee shop somewhere in LA, and Zander does something very nice for him. A nice touch, I’ll admit. I’m a sucker those little things thrown into plots. A short time after they meet, they wind up chatting online and have no idea they’ve actually met in person at the coffee shop. Another nice touch. I like kismet, too. While all this online chatting is going on, Blaine has no idea that his extremely humpy male stripper roommate has hijacked his account and Zander is actually speaking to Blaine thinking it’s the male stripper roommate, Cameron, because of the profile pic. So Zander is getting interested in Blaine while chatting, and thinking Blaine is actually looks like hot sexy male stripper Cameron. However, keep in mind that it’s not as though Blaine is flawed in any way.

The chatting leads to a phone call. And that night Blaine and Zander wind up speaking on the phone for so long Blaine’s twelve inch candle burns down to nothing. I don’t think that’s symbolic at all; I don’t think the people who wrote this film would even get this. But I have to admit that one of my all time favorite scenes in a film was with Orlando Bloom in “Elizabethtown” where he spends hours…days…speaking on the phone with Kirsten Dunst before he actually meets her again. I think that’s love and romance at its finest. I’m not joking either. I’ve watched that film so many times I could repeat the dialogue, and my favorite part is when they get to know each other on the phone. Dunst is just perfect, and she’s exactly what Bloom needs to move forward with his life. I couldn’t say the same about Blaine and Zander.

It’s different in “It’s Just Me.” You don’t actually get to hear much of the phone conversation they share, and they also wind up having phone sex before they actually meet. That didn’t happen in “Elizabethtown.” Now I have nothing against phone sex. And I’m no prude. But if I were looking to really get to know someone on a personal emotional level, and possibly fall in love with him, I wouldn’t be having phone sex with him that soon. It would be too creepy. There’s a line between sex for sex and falling in love sex, and phone sex at that stage of the game doesn’t work. I was actually hoping they wouldn’t do it while I watched, but they did. As a side note, there were no nude scenes or any significant erotic scenes to mention at all in this film. So don’t get too excited about that if you’re into phone sex. You’re going to be disappointed. There’s nothing sexy at all about this movie, and I don’t think they were trying to go for that either. So that wasn’t an issue for me, but it might be for others.

When Zander finally sends Blaine his digital photo, Blaine is thrilled to see that the man he’s been communicating with his nice looking. He’s actually thrilled, which made me wonder about how sincere he is about not caring too much about looks and superficial things. But then Blaine finds out that Zander thinks he’s been communicating with Cameron (sexy male stripper) because of the profile pic, and Blaine panics. This turns into a classic Hollywood farce where Cameron pretends to be Blaine when he meets Zander for the first time. It’s very Cyrano de BerGerac in a modern day gay situation.

The only problem is that Cameron is not as deep, smart, or thoughtful as Blaine. He’s basically a decent guy who makes money stripping, and he’s trying to break into films by taking on roles in cheesy horror movies. It’s interesting how they trash the horror movies in this film, too. They make jokes about Cameron’s films as if they are creating Oscar worthy viewing. I’m really not being snarky here; just honest. And that’s because the ultimate plot fail is that Zander meets this decent but shallow guy, Cameron, thinking he’s really Blaine, and never questions it. Zander doesn’t even question the fact that they have different voices after he’s already spoken to him on the phone. Which led me to believe that Zander was just another blithering idiot and Blaine’s better off without him. Had I been writing that film, that’s what I would have done and Blaine would have found true love somewhere else…anywhere else for that matter. Had I been Blaine in real life, I would have blocked Zander from all social media at once.

But I digress. As the ridiculous farce continues, different characters are shoved into the plot in slightly stereotypical ways. Zander’s living/renting (it’s never explained) with an older gay man who is the most depressing sad sack I’ve seen in years. He bakes cupcakes and says things like, “My story’s too sad to tell,” with a Joan Crawford swoon and a Bette Davis lilt in his voice. But even that’s a little exaggerated because we never really learn anything about the older guy’s past. His past just sucked. And he’s always there to offer his wisdom to poor Zander…who comes home and takes off his shirt the minute he walks through the door. I don’t know where they come up with that stuff, because any young gay man who takes off his shirt that way in front of an older gay man wants attention. Plain and simple. And who takes off his shirt the minute he comes home anyway? But we’re led to believe that Zander is just an unassuming simple gay man from Texas who would never worked an older gay man for sex or money in his life. He just an innocent kind of guy with a cute Texas accent. But he still strips down, and the older guy’s tongue hangs out. The Texas stereotype didn’t sit well with me either. I often think these LA and NY movie types assume we all just hopped off the turnip truck, with a guitar, a cowboy hat, and a simple dream.

Another character that’s slightly stereotypical is Blaine’s “girlfriend.” She’s so insignificant to the plot I don’t even remember her name. She’s really Blaine’s fag hag, she’s there to offer him advice on love and relationships, and she’s just a bunch of pithy sarcastic fun.

I’m not going to get into anything else because I don’t want this review to have any spoilers. Not that it matters much because the plot is basically the same thing I’ve seen before in so many other gay themed movies. In fact, I watched this with Tony and we had it figured out within the first half hour and we were right.

But that doesn’t mean I’m not going to recommend this film. I actually did enjoy it in spite of all the issues above. You just can’t take it seriously; I don’t think it was intended to be taken seriously. And that’s the spirit with which it should be viewed. There’s nothing better than a campy gay movie that doesn’t always make sense. One where you love to hate the characters. And truly best of all,  the most unlikely character, the careless male stripper roommate, Cameron, turns out to be the smartest, the coolest, and the only person in a sea of virtual WTF-ery I’d want to get to know in real life.

If I had to rate this on a five star scale, I’d have to give it four stars just because it’s so entertaining in a campy way. The acting was good, too. And even though there were so many plot failures, I think it did touch on a few relevant issues that younger gay men are experiencing right now.