don’t over edit

Nude Davey Wavey; OUT List 100; Don’t Over Edit

Nude Davey Wavey

For anyone who’s curious, I’m linking to a web site where you can view full frontal nude pics of gay youtube performer, Davey Wavey. As usual, the comment thread is entertaining…trust me on this.

And the mystery is over.

Read More Here…

OUT List 100

Out Magazine does a list each year mentioning 100 people. Some are significant, others questionable. But that depends on personal taste.

Marriage equality advocate Edie Windsor, director Lee Daniels and out actors Wentworth Miller and Jim Parsons take top honors on Out Magazine’s OUT 100 list for 2013.

I think when you read the back story behind some of them it’s even more interesting because it shows how deeply intense it still is for most gay men and women to actually accept being gay, and even talk about it openly. The list is long, but most are worth reading.

Others surprise me, like Brett Easton Ellis.  He was banned from GLAAD awards for tweets he made. But I don’t follow much of what Ellis does, so I rarely link to anything Ellis related.

Read more here, or check out the list itself, here.

Don’t Over Edit

By over edit I mean don’t over criticize another author’s work without taking certain aspects of style and poetic license into consideration. The article I’m linking to now that was posted on Lit Agent Janet Reid’s blog seems to nail this topic in a few lines.

At the start of my career I was guilty of some of that thinking to be sure. I assumed that words or sentences that were “wrong” were mistakes. So I “fixed” them. It took me a while to realize that sometimes those weren’t mistakes, those were style.

This seems to be something novices do more than seasoned critics. I’ve done it, I’ve seen new copy editors do it, and if you’re unlucky enough to get a new copy editor who doesn’t know what he or she is doing it can really fuck up a manuscript and ruin the style and content as a result. I actually once had a copy editor “correct” dialogue…dialogue I’d written on purpose that gave one character a distinct voice. Let’s just say I didn’t back down that time, and one new copy editor received a crash course in how not to edit an author’s style.

In the same respect, there’s one newer m/m author out there who makes almost every mistake in the proverbial book, but his voice and style are both so great it doesn’t really matter because in his case it’s more about the story than a lesson in English. I’m not linking to him because it sounds more like a left-handed compliment and I don’t want anyone to misinterpret that. No one can do what he does, quite the way he does it.

In other words, things like common usage are important to take into consideration, and don’t assume that because your seventh grade English teacher said it was right makes it standard in all fiction.

Read more here….