chaz bono

Good For Cher: Chaz Bono on Dancing with the Stars



I probably should have left up my new release post for the weekend. But I saw this about Cher and Chaz Bono and couldn’t help posting about it right now.

When I made my last post, about Chaz doing the reality show, I was a little surprised at some of the negative reactions I received. And from gay and straight people, too. Well, anyone who knows me knows I don’t buckle when it comes to things like this. I kept the post up and I’m posting about it again. This is what the T in GLBT is all about, and I’ll fight to my death for tolerance.

Good for Cher for coming to his defense!!

As for Chaz, you may not like it, you may not understand it. You may not even want to like it or understand it. But the point is that Chaz Bono is doing something most people wouldn’t have the guts to do. And I find that amazing…on so many levels I could fill this entire blog with examples. And I don’t even like dancing myself…can’t do it….won’t even try. But I’ll be watching this show.

….Cher takes to Twitter to defend Chaz Bono on DWTS

By Sandy Cohen | AP – Thu, Sep 1, 2011 9:08 AM PDT

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..LOS ANGELES – Cher is taking to Twitter to defend her son Chaz Bono.

The superstar posted several tweets Wednesday defending his participation on the upcoming season of “Dancing With the Stars.” Bono is the first transgender competitor on the hit ABC show.

Cher says her son, who was born female and underwent surgery to become a man, is being “viciously attacked” on blogs and message boards since the new cast was announced Monday.

“This is Still America right? It took guts 2 do it,” Cher wrote, adding that she supports him no matter what he chooses to do.

“Mothers don’t stop Getting angry with stupid bigots who (mess) with their children!” the 65-year-old singer wrote.

Bono, 42, is paired with pro dancer Lacey Schwimmer on the reality show, where celebrities and their professional partners perform various ballroom dances for judges’ scores and viewer votes.

“Dancing” fans have posted both angry and supportive comments on the show’s message boards. One called the casting choice “disgusting” and said “ABC should be ashamed of theirselves for harassing mainstream Americans and Christains.”

Another wrote: “I never and mean NEVER watch DWTS but will this season to support/vote for (Chaz).”

On his own Twitter page, Bono described himself as “the luckiest guy around” and thanked his fans for their support. He also thanked Cher.

“Thanks for all your support mom,” he wrote. “The haters are just motivating me to work harder and stay on DWTS as long as I possibly can.”

The 13th season of “Dancing With the Stars” is set to premiere Sept. 19.

Chaz Bono on Dancing with the Stars…



I’m obviously still here and Hurricane Irene didn’t do me in. In fact, as far as storms go, I’ve seen much worse. We’re used to nor’easters up here, with wind gusts up to 90 mph. The highest wind gusts we had here, and I’m only two hours away from Atlantic City where the eye was, were about 50 mph. But no complaints from me. It could have been much worse and I’m glad it wasn’t.

I just read here that Chaz Bono is going to be on Dancing with the Stars. Even though I can’t stand to dance myself, I do love to watch the dancers on that show. Jerry Springer amazed me. My heart sank when Kirsti Alley tripped and fell on her partner’s leg.

You have to give Chaz credit. And I’m not talking about the transgender thing. I’m talking about his having the guts to go on that show and dance in front of the world. I couldn’t do it. I’m not that brave. From what I’ve seen, it’s intense at best. And unless you’ve had formal training as a dancer, there’s no way it can be easy.

Chaz Bono…Transition: The Story of How I Became A Man


I don’t usually take time out of my day to watch Oprah at four o’clock in the afternoon. But I did today, because Chaz Bono was doing an interview and promoting his new book, Transition: The Story Of How I Became A Man.

Although I can’t relate completely as a gay man, I did have a friend once who was a woman who felt as if he was trapped in a man’s body. I didn’t know this at first. He was always very reclusive and quiet. And he refused to show is feet…even when he went to the beach. As it turned out, he refused to show is feet because his toenails were always painted and he didn’t want anyone to find out. It wouldn’t have mattered: he was with a group of gay people who wouldn’t have cared whether his toenails were painted or not. But in his mind the magnitude of wanting to be a woman was so intense he created this sort of block that kept him separated from the rest of the world. It’s the only way I can describe it.

Eventually, he came to terms and is now living somewhere in Philadelphia as a woman. But he cut off all his friends, even the ones who would have supported him, because it was such an intense situation for him. So while I can’t personally relate to this topic, I’m very empathetic to it and I think what Chaz did took a massive amount of courage most people wouldn’t be able to handle.

I’ll be reading Chaz’s book. And, I hope Chaz decides to enter this in the Rainbow Awards this year. I think it’s a must read for anyone in the lgbt community.

At first, America knew the only child of Sonny and Cher as Chastity, the cherubic little girl who appeared on her parents’ TV show. In later years, she became famous for coming out on a national stage, working with two major organizations toward LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) rights and publishing two books. And just within the past eighteen months, Chaz Bono has entered the public consciousness as the most high-profile transgender person ever.

All through the hoopla surrounding his change, Chaz has insisted on maintaining his privacy. Now, in Transition, Chaz finally tells his story. Part One traces his decision to transition, beginning in his childhood-when he played on the boys’ teams and wore boys’ clothing whenever possible-and going through his painful, but ultimately joyful, coming out in his twenties, up to 2008, when, after the death of his father, drug addiction, and five years of sobriety, Chaz was finally ready to begin the process of changing his gender. In Part Two, he offers an unprecedented record in words and photographs of the actual transition, a real-time diary as he navigates uncharted waters. These chapters capture the day-to-day momentum of his life as his body changes.

Throughout the book, Chaz touches on themes of identity, gender, and sexuality; parents and children; and how harboring secrets shatters the soul. It is an amazing contribution to our understanding of a much- misunderstood community.