books set in Italy

Review: Lethal Obsession Deserted

Review: Lethal Obsession Deserted

http://www.amazon.com/Lethal-Obsession-Deserted-Michele-Montgomery-ebook/dp/B00G799HX4/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386116493&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=Michele+Montgomery+Lethal+Obsession+desserted

I love any book that begins with an acknowledgement to Glenfidditch, however, that was only the beginning with this one. Lucca is a lonely, arrogant, rebellious young man who seems to crave attention from his family. However, due to this lack of attention from family he winds up finding it in a few questionable places. Almost as if he’s daring himself to see how far he will go. And in the same respect, his self-destructive nature could also be described as vengeance toward his family. His only consolation in Italy is his mentor, Sal, who sometimes seems too nice for a young man who needs more guidance. The first chapter moves fast, and the the story really begins when Lucca asks Sal to take him to America. Only that makes life more complicated, and it changes Lucca in ways he couldn’t have predicted.

Lucca becomes obsessed with the idea that he needs to be worth something to someone, which is almost a direct quote from the story. And in order to prove his worth, and to prove how determined he is, he stuns his family with something they never saw coming and disappears into the world of BDSM in Denver, CO, with his friend, Marcello. When the family realizes he’s gone, Carl, from the prologue, enters the picture through friends of friends and he reluctantly begins a search for Lucca. But Carl also has a story of his own:  Carl opened the door and stopped for a moment to process the feeling that hit him every time he entered the club, the feeling that he’d just tumbled down the rabbit hole and into a sexual wonderland. And at this point in the book I would be remiss if I didn’t mention how well the subject of BDSM is handled. There’s nothing too graphic, but it’s the concept that is treated with respect to those who are into the scene, which I found interesting as a bystander who isn’t into BDSM. I don’t see that often in BDSM books.

In the meantime, Lucca and Marcello form a closer bond because of their circumstances and I often felt as if Lucca feels responsible for Marcello. From there, the BDSM scene continues in more interesting ways I’d rather not say to avoid spoilers. Marcello is not as savvy or articulate as Lucca, and he becomes a liability Lucca’s not sure he’s willing to deal with. As the character of Carl is explained in more detail, we see him as a stronger, almost stubborn man who is determined to get what he wants and we’re not certain about him just yet. All we know is he wants to find Lucca.

In some scenes that follow, the BDSM world is shown to be a sometimes dangerous place for young men who aren’t as careful as they should be. Marcello discovers this after a particularly bad scene he does because he needs the money. This is when we see a stronger side of Lucca as he convinces Marcello to go home. In the same respect, he refuses to go himself in spite of the things he knows he must do to survive. Then Carl enters the picture again and ignores his own feelings because he’s promised Lucca’s parents he would bring him home again. He then becomes a counselor, or guardian of sorts and tries to convince Lucca his family really cares about him.

What happens after this is a surprise. In fact, like with most of Michele Montgomery’s books, there are a few surprises I didn’t expect and I don’t want to spoil them for the reader. From a more technical POV, the book is written well, with careful attention to detail and it’s not overwritten. I speak and read book Italian, but I think it’s important to mention this for those who don’t. The dialogue constantly moves the story forward and that’s interesting because part of the book is set in Italy and the characters are Italian. However, this is handled very professionally, without words and phrases…or colloquialisms…that stop the story, or that the average reader might not understand. We know they are Italian and the book continues in English so it will move forward. It’s a clever trick most seasoned novelists understand. And not one that’s easily obtained. Montgomery has a way of drawing the reader into the story with dialogue in all her books, but I found this one especially well-executed.

I would recommend this book to anyone for several reasons. One, because it’s so well-written. And two, because even if you aren’t into the BDSM scene it’s interesting to read about them in a book like this that’s more focused on love, emotion, rebellion, and the kind of relationships that grow from some underlying connection that’s not always visible, but is there all the time. And once again, I’ll take these characters with me for a long time.

To read more and purchase the book, click the photo above which is a link to Amazon.