bestsellers

New York Times: E-Books and Best-Seller List

I copied and pasted the article below from this link. It’s just one more of the daily changes happening within the publishing industry in the past few years. And I can’t help but remember that almost two years ago a good friend of mine who works in publishing told me e-books wouldn’t last and there was no reason to take them seriously. Evidently, the NYT seems to think there’s something to e-books now.

In an acknowledgment of the growing sales and influence of digital publishing, The New York Times said on Wednesday that it would publish e-book best-seller lists in fiction and nonfiction beginning early next year.
The lists will be compiled from weekly data from publishers, chain bookstores, independent booksellers and online retailers, among other sources.
Since 1935 The Times has published best-seller lists, widely considered the industry standard. Best-seller lists are also published by Publishers Weekly, a trade publication, and newspapers including The Los Angeles Times and USA Today.
Janet Elder, the editor of news surveys and election analysis for The Times, said the newspaper had spent two years creating a system that tracks and verifies e-book sales.
“We’ve had our eye on e-book sales since e-books began,” Ms. Elder said. “It was clear that e-books were taking a greater and greater share of total sales, and we wanted to be able to tell our readers which titles were selling and how they fit together with print sales.”
E-book sales have risen steeply in 2010, spurred by the growing popularity of the Amazon
Kindle and by the release of the Apple iPad in April. According to the Association of American Publishers, which receives sales data from publishers, e-book sales in the first nine months of 2010 were $304.6 million, up from $105.6 million from the same period in 2009, a nearly 190 percent increase.
Several major publishers said that e-books had climbed to about 10 percent of their total trade sales. Some publishing experts have predicted that they will rise to 25 percent in the next two to three years.
RoyaltyShare, a San Diego-based company that tracks data and aggregates sales information for publishers, will work with The Times, provide data and offer an additional source of independent corroboration.
The Times will also redesign the section of its Sunday Book Review that features the best-seller lists. The Times already publishes 14 lists, including those for fiction, nonfiction and advice books in hardcover and paperback, as well as children’s books and graphic books.
“To give the fullest and most accurate possible snapshot of what books are being read at a given moment you have to include as many different formats as possible, and e-books have really grown, there’s no question about it,” said Sam Tanenhaus, editor of the Book Review. The new listings, he added, give readers “the fullest picture we can give them about how a book is doing week to week.”

You Can Never Predict Anything in Publishing

If it sounds like I’m blowing my own horn in this post, I’m not. I’m seriously surprised and I’m writing this post to let other authors know that even though you think you can predict what will happen to your book, you can never really be sure.

A REGULAR BUD was originally a short story published in a small anthology by STARbooks Press. This was a nice little anthology, but I made very little money and the story received limited exposure. And I was fine with this. As a writer, I thought I knew the drill. I’d have my short story published in an anthology, I’d enjoy the fact that someone wanted to publish it in the first place, and then I’d move on to the next project.

So when I decided to re-write A REGULAR BUD and have it published by loveyoudivine.com as a stand alone e-book, I didn’t expect the book to do much. When I submitted it, I told myself I’d be happy if it sold a few copies and paid for its costs with the publisher (I tend to take this aspect of publishing seriously: I like to know the publisher didn’t waste their time with me and with a book that didn’t sell anything.)

And to my ultimate shock, A REGULAR BUD has been on the fictionwise.com bestseller list as either number one, two , or three, in the fetish/erotica category since it’s publication as a stand alone e-book with loveyoudivine.com. I didn’t even consider the book a fetish story. Though there is a small fetish in the book, it wasn’t the way I’ve been promoting it. To me, this was a nice little romance between a guy in his thirties and a guy in his early twenties who happened to run into each other at a very awkward time. And the fact that it even sold copies, forget about being on a bestseller list, has blown me away. I will say that I loved the new cover for the loveyoudivine.com stand alone version and I was hoping A REGULAR BUD would at the very least be received well enough to get a couple of nice reviews. But I never thought it would be on any bestseller lists.

So if any other authors are reading this, you just can’t predict where a book is going to go and how readers are going to receive it. You might think you know what you’re doing, but there are always surprises out there and you just can’t imagine the outcome.

Duel Post: A Huge Thank You, and Ravenous Romance is on TV Again

First, I’d like to thank all the readers who have helped make DOWN THE BASEMENT number six on http://www.allromanceebooks.com/. I’m still surprised. And when I say thanks, I really mean it.

Second, Ravenousromance.com will be on The Home Shopping Network again this Friday, selling the Escape to Romance Collection, at 8 in the morning and 2 in the afternoon. This is exciting for everyone associated with ravenous. Even though none of my books are part of the collection, I’m supporting RR as much as I can. I’ve read the books in the collection, and I’m a huge fan of all the writers. So if you need any last minute Christmas gifts, check it out. This is the last day that HSN will guarantee shipping by Christmas Day.