100 anniversary

Titanic Debris Field Mapped Out



I’m afraid you’re going to have to indulge me for a while. I had a completely different post planned for today about authors behaving badly, but it’s going to have to wait. When I see something that’s Titanic related and looks interesting I’m posting about it. This is partly because I’ve always been interested in the subject and partly because this is the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic and I think it deserves attention. And, since I started writing “Unmentionable: The Men Who Loved on the Titanic,” I’ve become slightly hooked. Nasty authors can wait for another day (smile.)

Here’s part of, and a link to, an article I read this morning.

SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine — Researchers have pieced together what’s believed to be the first comprehensive map of the entire 3-mile-by-5-mile Titanic debris field and hope it will provide new clues about what exactly happened the night 100 years ago when the superliner hit an iceberg, plunged to the bottom of the North Atlantic and became a legend.

Marks on the muddy ocean bottom suggest, for instance, that the stern rotated like a helicopter blade as the ship sank, rather than plunging straight down, researchers told The Associated Press this week.

An expedition team used sonar imaging and more than 100,000 photos taken from underwater robots to create the map, which shows where hundreds of objects and pieces of the presumed-unsinkable vessel landed after striking an iceberg, killing more than 1,500 people.

Here’s a link that I hope works now, where you can read more.