Month: October 2013

Gay Halloween; E-book Sales Level; Death of Pen Names

Gay Halloween

My last official post on Halloween for the next full year, I promise. But I saw this article titled, How Gay is Halloween, and figured I’d post one more time. There are a few LGBT historical facts I found interesting as well as an account of how gays wanted to be visible in public post Stonewall.

When Lee started the parade in 1974, gay men were just beginning to gain real militancy. The Stonewall riots were a recent memory, and gay activism was still in its nascent stages. The gay community wanted to be gay in public. Mainstream culture wanted them to be quiet in public. A Halloween parade, then, was a perfect solution for everyone, because it permitted the gays to be as loud as they wanted under certain conditions. For one wild night, the rules of American gender would be temporarily suspended, and gay men could wear all the glitter that they wanted. But come the following morning, the tiaras were put away as gay men prepared for 364 days of heteronormative winter.

The only thing I’d like to add here is that NOT all gay men take Halloween all that seriously. Tony and I used go to Provincetown on Halloween when our one dog was younger and we didn’t put on costumes and we weren’t concerned with being “public.” We were there. We were gay. We had fun watching the bad drag and wearing heavy coats on The Cape. But Halloween isn’t a highly significant holiday for us, at least not like it is for some gay men. And we are by no means closeted gay men. I think it’s important to point these things out as many times as possible so people who are not gay understand there is a great deal of diversity within the gay community that is often overlooked. And let’s face it. Who gets more media attention? The gay attorney who goes to work in a suit, drives a Mercedes, and goes out to a great restaurant on Halloween night to avoid dealing with annoying trick or treaters, or the gay man who puts on lipstick and earrings for Halloween? I’m not being glib about this either. There’s nothing wrong with lipstick and earrings. It’s just not for all of us.

In any event, the article is interesting, with some solid facts.

E-Book Sales Level

The blog post I’m linking to now is long, but it gets into a few interesting points about the e-book boom we’ve experienced in the past few years, self-publishing, and how some authors who were making six figures are not seeing those same numbers anymore. It’s interesting for both authors and readers. But take into consideration that with all pieces like this it is only one person’s opinion and isn’t based on anything solid, and the author admits this openly.

I can’t say this definitively. I could be wrong. This is where I’m going out on a bit of a limb, making a prediction based on intuition and only a smattering of anecdotal evidence. But I’ve now heard enough from writers all across the genres that despite working harder and smarter, putting out more titles, getting better, promoting the smart way, they’re seeing a general decline in sales per title, that I can no longer dismiss it. It’s not seasonal. It’s not temporary. Yes, in a business like this one, there’s always going to be exceptions, individual writers bucking the trend but as an aggregate, the long tail affect has finally arrived. The early adopter eBook bounce is over.

Speaking from my own experience, because of the sub-genre where I focus, I’ve remained basically even with sales for the past five years or so. But I’ve always concentrated more on building a small readership, knowing that what I write is not going to appeal to the masses…at least not yet at this point in my career. In other words, I’m in this alone, and I work alone. I’m a career writer, not a social planner.

The author of the post also gets into the future, and what may or may not happen:

 But if you’re a professional writer, either full time or part time, one who wants to be compensated fairly for his or her work just like any craftsman, things are going to be different going forward. 

Then he gets into quality, and makes it clear his opinions are subjective. The only problem here is that I’ve already seen several comments about this post, and quality, where people who have a problem being subjective have misinterpreted this and they make it sound as if just because an author is prolific he or she doesn’t produce quality books. And that is subjective, highly subjective, and I think it’s important to understand that all authors work at different paces. And those who work slowly can put out some pretty low quality horseshit books, too. I’ve read few.

I had planned to comment more on this post, however, I decided not to do that because it’s an opinion piece and the author of the post makes that clear in several places. But the one thing I would like to comment on is that I would like to see this need to label e-books as something different or unique from print books disappear. E-books are books just like print books are books. This need to differenciate between the two is getting tired.

I also think it’s going to be important for all authors who want to remain relevant in the future to figure out ways to keep reinventing themselves all the time. Publishing nowadays moves at a much faster pace than it did ten or twenty years ago. And in order to keep up with that pace it’s going to mean constant evolution for authors.

Death of Pen Names

This post is also written by the author who wrote the post I linked to above. When I saw it listed on his side bar I couldn’t resist mentioning it. I just posted about this topic recently, once again, because I saw an author in the m/m genre in a video introducing himself with a pen name and it took me by surprise. I couldn’t figure out why he would do that (use a pen name), and I think the blog post I’m linking to now backs me up. I also mentioned a few of my own pen names, something I wouldn’t have done a few years ago.

The post I’m linking to here is a long one, but very interesting. He talks about why he’s going to use his own name now, and why he’s releasing back list titles that origianlly had pen names, with his own name.

It was a bit of work, but it was worth it to me. I can’t deny that maybe a little bit of ego was involved, too. So sue me. My name is my brand. I don’t know what that brand is, exactly, except I can tell you this: You may not like everything I write, but you’ll always get my best effort. I hope that’s enough.

I recently did this myself with several back list titles when e-publisher loveyoudivine.com shuttered its web site after many years in business last June and the rights reverted back to me. I had a few titles with them in different sub-genres and at the time we thought it would be best to use a pen name. I don’t see the point anymore, and I’ve released them with my own name this time. And I’m going to talk with one of my publishers about putting my own name on two books that have pen names.

You can read more here. As I said, it’s a long post, but worth checking out if you’re an author, especially if you’re already branded in one genre and you have a readership. Taking on a pen name is like taking on a completley new career. And unless there are obvious reasons, like with J.K.Rowling, I’m starting to think it’s pointless to do unless you truly want to take on a whole new career and distance yourself from everything you’ve done in the past.

Fall Into Romance Contest Winner

Fall Into Romance Contest Winner

Last weekend I was part of a blog tour called Fall Into Romance and I offered a free give-away.

I decided to offer two free e-books from the Bad Boy Billionaire series. These are the most recent I have out, and I’m hoping the winner hasn’t read them yet. The winner can choose between any two of them. Here’s an Amazon link where they are listed. If the winner has read them all, we’ll come up with something else. And, this contest (for me) is open to everyone all over the globe, not just US residents. The contest begins at midnight tonight, so please refrain from commenting until then to keep it fair for everyone.

In order to win the two free e-books I’m offering, just comment here on this blog post and I’ll choose the winner at random like I’ve done in the past. I might be posting other things this weekend, but this post will be up forever. And please make sure to leave an e-mail address or let me know how I can contact you within the body of the comment. You can comment anonymously, too, and just leave the e-mail address. The winner will be contacted by me no later than November 7th.

This afternoon I chose one of the comments at random and the winner was someone named “Shadow.” (I write the names down on pieces of paper and Tony picks the winner.) I’ll be in touch by this weekend and the winner can choose any two e-books from the Bad Boy Billionaire series.

I’m also offering a consolation prize to everyone who left a comment. I usually do this with all contests…partly because I hate loosing and I know how it feels 🙂 I’ll contact everyone by the end of this weekend.

Steve Grand Slammed; Ben Cohen Strips for Gays

Steve Grand Slammed

Last summer when country/pop singer, Steve Grand, released  a music video I posted about him here. At the time he was so fresh there wasn’t much I could find about him anywhere. But the one thing that did stand out about his song was the fact that it was all about a young gay man falling in love with a straight men, and how the young gay man winds up with a broken heart.

With the blog hop for equal rights this weekend I thought it would be appropriate to post something about gay country music star, Steve Grand, because he’s making history, promoting equal rights, and breaking the stereotypes at the same time. I saw one post earlier today that linked to a Steve Grand post with a less than thrilling comment thread…pure garbage and filled with the kind of snark I don’t tolerate anymore.

Since I wrote that post, Grand has continued to make history and break stereotypes, which isn’t easy to do if you are gay because the same old sterotypes that have been following gay men around forever don’t seem to go away. And even worse, people who claim to support gay men often seem to be the same people who crave those sterotypes. Because Steve Grand didn’t just get heat from the comment thread I mentioned in the excerpt from the post above. He also got slammed for writing a song where a young gay man falls in love with a young straight man. Some seem to think Grand should have made the gay man fall in love with another gay man.

Here’s a quote where Steve Grand responded to all this:

‘Because this was my experience growing up. Many times,’ Grand says. ‘I grew up in a predominantly heterosexual world. Most of the crushes I had were straight men. Gay men were not visible. I wanted to tell a story that had been burning inside me.’

‘It’s a universal human story – unrequited love. Gay or straight, we’ve all been there. When I started writing music, I was always writing about that. I was always crushing on someone I couldn’t be with.’

I’d like to know what’s so difficult to understand about that? Grand isn’t writing an m/m romance. He’s writing about his own life experience and it’s coming from his heart, from his experience as a gay man. This isn’t fantasy with HEA. This is reality. And because most gay men…me included…grew up in heteronormative worlds, our first crushes were directed toward straight men. And I think the most important thing to understand here is that Steve Grand, as the gay man, gets the last word about what it’s like to be gay growing up in a straight world.

If all gay men had a normal puberty and they dated other gay men as YAs, I wouldn’t even be writing this post. But the fact remains that gay men don’t get a puberty like straight men and they usually wind up in impossible situations where unrequited love is inevitable.

You can read more here. The piece goes into more detail about what Steve Grand was like growing up.

Ben Cohen Strips for Gays


Speaking of breaking stereotypes and unrequited love, British rugby player and gay activist, Ben Cohen, is coming out with a new calendar where all proceeds will benefit his foundation that focuses on stopping homophobia and bullying in schools. And according the photos on this web site to which I’m linking, he’s going to raise a great deal of money and awareness. There’s a video, too.

This time he has invited us for a sneak peak into the shower and the locker room for a behind-the-scenes look.
 
Although Cohen is the perfect example of so many gay male fantasies, he is straight and he’s comfortable with his status as a gay icon, so to speak. This also makes sense to me. He’s a man. Gay men like men. And guess what, gay men like showers and locker rooms. I probably shouldn’t have let that secret out of the proverbial bag, but there you are.
 
Cohen created The Ben Cohen Stand Up Foundation to Stop Homophobia and Bullying. You can check out the foundation’s web site here. It’s really a steller web site and I highly suggest looking at it.
 
In this article he talks about being on the reality TV show, Strictly Come Dancing, and states that he would be open to dancing with a man on TV. The reason I find that interesting is because I often watch the US show, Dancing with the Stars, and I always wonder why there are never two male contestants dancing in the competition. Too much for liberal left wing Hollywood to handle?
 
In any event, Cohen said this, in public: 
 
“I’ve no qualms dancing with a woman or a man,” Cohen is quoted by the Mirror as saying. “Kristina [Rihanoff] will be easier to pick up though.”
 

I’ve always wanted to learn how to dance.

Shower image above can be found here.  The copyright holder of this file allows anyone to use it for any purpose, provided that the copyright holder is properly attributed. Redistribution, derivative work, commercial use, and all other use is permitted.

One Year After Hurricane Sandy…

One Year After Hurricane Sandy…

This time last year Tony and I were in our basement preparing for a long night of destructive winds, battering rains, and the worst storm of this century so far. We had been following the weather reports all week and we knew what to expect. Or at least we thought we knew. I posted about this last year, here.

As everyone knows by now, the path of destruction from Hurricane Sandy goes on for miles. I have been trying to keep in touch with friends and family in Manhattan via text and e-mail, and it’s been difficult at best. Power is out all over NY, NJ and PA and most land lines don’t work. So far, everyone I know is OK, thankfully.

Looking back now, I can say this was the worst storm I’ve ever lived through and there are still parts of Bucks County, PA, where you can see remnants of the wind damage. Many of the large trees that went down still haven’t been removed in certain places. In other places where trees had to be cut to make way for roads the stumps are still there, tipped sideways. This past weekend we had the first bonfire of the season, and most the what we burned were tree limbs and branches that came down during Sandy. At the time, we just piled them into a corner and waited for them to season a little. And it was the biggest bonfire we’ve had in ten years. The photo above only shows the beginning.

We were lucky, though. This part of PA only got hit with the wind, unlike parts of the Jersey Shore where entire towns were ruined and lives were changed forever because of the wind and rain. People are still cleaning up the mess in many places.

When Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast a year ago, it swept away homes and left neighborhoods in ruin. It destroyed roads and flooded subways tunnels. It sank boats and damaged cars. It drenched paintings and shuttered museums. It left millions without power, disrupting hospitals and schools. When it was all over, Sandy had done $68 billion worth of damage.

You can read more here.

We lost power for twelve days, and we had a generator so we were at least able to hook up to some parts of civilization. But even that became an issue because we reached one point after the fifth day where we couldn’t even find an open gas station to fill the gas tanks so the generator would run. We finally wound up finding gas about twenty-five miles away, and we waited in line for an hour and a half. And yet, in spite of all the inconvenience, we still knew we were lucky compared to many other people in New York and New Jersey.

And for some it’s still not over.

Thousands of New York and New Jersey residents displaced when Superstorm Sandy barreled ashore one year ago are still fighting with insurance companies, slogging through red tape and waiting for government aid – and many still aren’t home.

Sean Hayes Apologizes; What Is a Book Blogger? A Book "Influencer?"

Sean Hayes Apologizes

I love when LGBT people with high profiles back me up this way. I’ve often posted about how I’m not fond of National Coming Out Day, and how coming out is such a personal thing no one should ever feel pressured about it. And now actor, Sean Hayes, from Will and Grace, made a few recent comments about how difficult it was for him to come out, and why he didn’t do it sooner.

“I was so young,” Hayes said. “It made me go back in the closet [with the media] because I was so overwhelmed at 26 or 27. I didn’t want the responsibility, I didn’t know how to handle the responsibility of speaking for the gay community. I always felt like I owed them a huge apology for coming out too late. Some people in the gay community were very upset with me for not coming out on their terms. They don’t stop to think about what’s going on in somebody’s personal life, and the struggles that they’re having. It was all very scary. We got death threats. It was a really rough time for me, but I was also having the time of my life.”

For me, that’s heart wrenching. If I were in the room with Hayes when he said that I would need a box of tissues. But that’s not all. It gets even deeper when Hayes talks about how gay news organizations like The Advocate slammed him for not coming out sooner. And what really bothers me the most about this is that those who scream for tolerance the loudest always seem to be the most intolerant. I don’t think Hayes owes anyone an apology.

In any event, I hope Hayes knows how much good he did for the LGBT community. And this is the absolute truth: I sometimes post about getting letters and e-mails from closeted gay men who can’t come out…or aren’t ready to come out. One of these people lives a truly closeted life because of his religion/culture, his family circumstances, and his background. And he’s recently been telling me that he has been watching old reruns of Will and Grace and it’s helping him a lot. So the things actors like Sean Hayes did for the LGBT community continue to evolve in many different ways so many years later.

You can read the full article here.


What Is a Book Blogger?

Someone asked me this question a few weeks ago and I’ve been wanting to post about it for a while. First, I looked all over for one set definition of what a book blogger is and couldn’t come up with anything definitive. In fact, the places where I’m linking today even state they don’t know the definition and it’s only their opinion. So it’s important to keep in mind not all things have set definitions, at least not at this point.

This web site discusses what book blogging means to her. She makes no claim to define book blogging:

When I began book blogging six years ago, I had no idea just how much of a community there was out there. Suddenly I found myself among likeminded people—people with a passion for books and writing—for talking about those books and other bookish tidbits. While we share in our love for books, our experiences with those books can vary widely. It gives me the chance to hear a different perspective, think a little differently, and branch out to try something new.

This next web site talks about something more definitive, and yet makes no claims to give a set definition of a book blogger. They’ve also created a book blogging directory, which is discussed with what I thought was a very open-minded approach.

So, what do we all think? Is an author a book blogger, or do they need to at least be chatting about other people’s books as well as their own to qualify? What about other types of bloggers who occasionally talk books? What about blogs that are attached to bookstores? Often there are reviews amongst their posts, but really the aim is to try to get people to buy from the store.

I find that interesting because I don’t consider myself a book blogger, not with this blog. I’m an author and I present information about my books to readers. I also review books on occasion here. I often discuss books I like. But I keep this blog more focused on pop culture, LGBT issues, and publishing in a general sense.

I even discovered there is a book blogger week, and this web site gives the most definitive answer of what a book blogger is that I’ve found so far.

Let’s step back, first, and ask, what is a book blogger? The answer is simple: it’s someone who blogs about books. About the books they love, the books they like, the books they hate. It’s someone who usually does it all on their own time: the reading, the writing, the posting, the commenting, the (insert all the stuff it takes beyond reading and posting to be a blogger).

But then what’s the difference between a book review site and a book blogger?

I won’t even try to define that because I think it’s vague at best. But I have always considered book review site more geared toward criticism…good and bad…than actual book discussion. But even then there’s a certain amount of book discussion on book review blogs, so it gets even more confusing.

A Book “Influencer?”

Now this was something I’d never seen before: a book influencer. And the blogger I’m linking to here asks the question, “What’s the Difference Between an Influencer and a Book Reviewer?”

I’m not exactly sure where or when the term Influencer originated. But in the publishing world Influencer is often used to refer to a reader who signs up to help in the promotion of a book in exchange for a free copy of that book. The author puts together a list of interested Influencers (a limited number), along with their addresses. The publisher then sends the book to those people (usually a couple weeks before the release).

The piece goes on to state that influencers are fans of the author, their goal is to promote the author and the book, and they do it in a variety of ways that may or may not include a book review. Then the term “Launch Team” is mentioned, which is a group of influencers who are strictly out to promote the author. I take this to be the same thing as a Street Team, but don’t quote me on that.

Essentially the terms are synonymous, except that an author may choose to keep a Launch Team ongoing via a Facebook Group or Email Loop.

Ultimately, this means that when you…the reader…see your favorite author on facebook getting tons of comments and photos posted to his or her timeline there is a good chance they aren’t coming from actual facebook friends or fans, at least no in the literal sense of fandom. There’s a good chance they are coming from influencers and teams of people who are only interested in promoting the author as much as they can so they can receive something in return. I don’t do this. Whatever you see on my timeline is coming from people that I didn’t solicit with gifts and free books. But it is common nowadays with many authors, and it’s getting easier to spot the more I see it. I don’t think there’s anything inherently wrong with it because in most cases the influencers are fans in a twisted ethical sense. But I do wonder what would happen if the authors who do this didn’t offer the influencers anything in return. In an offhanded way it reminds me of circus people who plant shills in audiences.

But this is a very honest article and I found it highly informative, especially the part where the author discusses the difference between a book reviewer and an influencer. She’s up front and totally honest, and I think this is one set definition we can trust.

In other words, a Book Reviewer’s goal is to help the reader make wise reading choices. An Influencer’s goal is to help the author with promotion.

As an author and a blogger it’s often hard to get into topics like this because one of my goals as an author is to promote my books and my publishers, and the other as a blogger is to provide honest objective information to readers with regard to any topic. Sometimes I’m not that objective. But when I do post about things like this I tend to lean more toward being a blogger than an author and I also tend to piss a few people off (other authors). A lot of authors don’t want you to know they have influencers or launch/street teams. Some of these authors are so promotion oriented they will cut your throat to sell a book that may or may not be a very good book. But in the spirit of full disclosure, as a blogger, I think it’s important for readers to know these things, and to understand what these terms mean so they can decide for themselves.


Rolling Stone: American Horror Story’s Incest, Bestiality, and Camp…

Rolling Stone on American Horror Story’s Incest, Bestiality, and Camp…

When I posted about American Horror Story’s most recent episode last week, I failed to mention the camp factor this season. But someone pointed me toward this article in Rolling Stone, and RS didn’t miss a beat. In fact, the entire commentary is priceless.

On Jessica Lange and the camp factor:

I usually tell them something along the lines of, “Long stretches of fabulous camp punctuated by lurid horror.” Most of that luscious camp is provided by Jessica Lange, which is why I cannot conceive of her leaving the show.

Lange has helped make the show a cult classic before its time and it often rivals films like “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane.” And I can’t help wondering if twenty years from now gay men of the future will be imitating Lange, verbatim.

On Incest:

While AHS’s horror tends to be violence-related, Coven conjured those moments in the most unexpected and unsettling ways. Like the incestuous Frankenstein abuse!

I just kept sitting there saying, “No, they aren’t going there. Tell me that didn’t just happen.”

And this part about bestiality just made me grab the arms of my chair:

Also, apparently she’s so desperate for love that she, well, she tries to lose her virginity to the Minotaur when he shows up to kill LaLaurie.
Yes, Queenie went out to the backyard to cruise a beast.

RS is being kind. There are some films where you remember exact scenes and for some reason they remain in your head forever. This scene, for me, will always be one of them. When Gabourey Sidibe, who plays Queenie, lifted her dress and shoved her fingers between her legs I knew I would never be the same again.

I still think that scene was out of character. I wanted to see Queenie show off her powers and tame the beast. I didn’t want to see her touch herself and bend over backwards.

The RS article goes into more detail about making babies witchcraft style, and discusses a scene where Lange kills off a character who is supposed to be the next “supreme.” And in the style of classic camp, heartless Lange tells the tongueless guy to remove the body from the living room because… “This coven doesn’t need a new Supreme. It needs a new rug.”

There’s not much taboo stuff left, so I wonder what’s next. They even covered rape in the first show. And forget about barely legal. The young women in the show are playing all underage characters.

In case you missed the link above, you can read the full article here.

Johnny Knoxville Penis Bad Grandpa; Taiwan Gay Cuties; Books Sold In A Year

Johnny Knoxville Penis Bad Grandpa


I haven’t seen Johnny Knoxville’s Bad Grandpa yet, but I plan to see it soon and I thought it was interesting that Knoxville beat Gravity this weekend. I’ve always had this theory that when films (or books, or even TV shows) are released how they are received depends a great deal on what the competition is. Would American Idol have been such a huge success if there had been something better on TV to compete with it? At the time, there wasn’t anything else on TV to watch. In this case, movies viewers chose to see Johnny Knoxville’s Bad Grandpa instead of George Clooney in Gravity because they had a choice.  This article goes deeper, and lists what other films did.

Paramount’s “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” topped the weekend box office with $32 million, according to studio estimates Sunday, sinking three-week champ “Gravity” to second place.

“Bad Grandpa” stars Johnny Knoxville as an accident-prone grandfather in the hidden-camera comedy.

And though people are still going to see Gravity in theaters, I can’t help but wonder which film would have won out had they both been released at the same time. In full disclosure, I’m a huge fan of Johnny Knoxville and what he’s achieved. I’m not a huge fan of George Clooney for many reasons, one of which has to do with his political rantings all the time. I don’t care what actors who are making millions and millions of dollars think of politics on any level, or in any political direction. And so far I don’t think Johnny Knoxville has ever been too political about anything. His goal is to entertain, to make people laugh, and to create physical comedy often at his own physical expense.

In fact, Knoxville has the penis injuries to prove this. This is from a Vanity Fair article.

Says Knoxville of his meat and two veg, “It’s just like a dog’s chew-toy down there. I broke my penis about three years ago trying to backflip a motorcycle. So that did’t help its appearance, although it’s pretty cute. I still have to use a catheter twice a day and it’s been three years now.” TWO TIMES A DAY?!? We just left our bodies and floated up onto the ceiling, that’s how painful that sounds.

For those who are so inclined, you can see Knoxville’s penis here at the OMG blog. (It looks okay to me, but that photo could have been shot before he broke his penis 🙂

In any event, for more information about Johnny Knoxville, you can read about him on wiki. I also think one of the most interesting things he’s done is the way he added homoerotic scenes to his TV shows and movies. But most of all I admire him because he’s been able to entertain people during some very difficult times in the US.

Taiwan Gay Cuties

This article is more about Taiwan’s Gay Pride March, however, when you check out the photo of Taiwan’s gay cuties you’ll see what I mean. I can’t share the photo here, but it is worth the trip over there with this link.

Gay Star News reported an overwhelming show of support for the Taiwanese LGBT community this weekend. An estimated 60,000 attendees took to Taipei’s streets to celebrate what is being called Asia’s biggest gay pride event.
 
And, the LGBT community there gained visible support from Google and Goldman Sachs employees. It’s being touted in other places as Asia’s biggest pride event to date.
 
Books Sold In A Year
 
I actually couldn’t tell you how many books I sell in a year, or even how many I’ve sold in my lifetime. I can tell you that all my books have earned out their advances, and I’ll be knocking wood and thanking the heavens while I tell you that. Because the fact is that it’s impossible to know how many books will sell for anyone. And the only reason I’m actually posting about this now is because I saw an author state on facebook that she sold 100,000 copies ( “100K”) in 2013, and 2013 isn’t even over yet. This is an unknown author, and a self-published author, and an author who writes in a small sub-genre. Could she have sold that many books? Of course. What are the odds of her actually selling that many books? Slim to zero.
 
The second conclusion is that a novel will probably sell fewer copies than you think. If a novel sells 10,000 copies in a year it is doing well. For a first time novelist, with little track record, a figure of 2000 copies per year is probably closer to the truth. Granted the figures in the post are based on Literary Fiction, a genre that is notoriously difficult to sell. Certain genres will be more popular and sell more books, but what is important for a writer is that they are realistic in their expectations.
 
You can read more here. If you do a simple search on this topic you will find more articles like this that say basically the same thing. I’ve been working in publishing for over twenty years and I can state from personal experience the articles are correct.
 
There are a lot of statements made out there on social media by aggressive authors we need to take with that proverbial grain of salt. And while it is possible that a self-pubbed author in a small sub-genre on the fringes of publishing can sell 100,000 copies in less than a year because anything is possible in publishing, it’s not all that probable. Facts don’t usually lie; people sometimes do.