Lady Gaga’s Bare Butt; M/M Review: See the Light by Cassandra Carr

Lady Gaga’s Bare Butt

For those of you who might be interested, there’s a link to an entertaining GIF with Lady Gaga’s bare butt.

Still dressed the seashell bra and thong underwear from her “Applause” performance that opened the evening’s show, the singer flashed her bare butt on camera, which she was shaking to the sweet sounds of JT.

This happened at the MTV VMAs while Justin Timberlake came out on stage.  I didn’t watch…her butt or the VMAs.

As a side note, while I’m sure there are a few people interested in seeing Lady Gaga’s bare ass, I think most of us would rather see Justin Timberlake’s.

M/M Book Review: See the Light by Cassandra Carr

One of the reasons I don’t write book reviews often is because they take so long to write. So I’ve decided to post a few mini reviews every now and then. This one is about a book I read over the weekend titled, See the Light by Cassandra Carr. The book is considered M/M, it’s the only book I’ve ever read by this author, and you can find it here.

The main theme of the book revolves around two closeted hockey players, Jason and Patrick. While I do like M/M books with jock themes, I’m not always a fan of any book that talks about the sport more than the love story. In See the Light, I was not disappointed. The author mentioned enough about hockey as a sport to keep me involved in a plot that was about hockey, but didn’t bore me with too many hockey details that would have been irrelevant to the love story. I also found the way Carr handled the relationships and interactions between the hockey players to be short and sweet, but at the same time extremely real. In other words, closeted gay hockey players put up an invisible wall to keep themselves protected. Their lives depend on this. As a gay man I fully understand this, and Carr did a great job at portraying what it must really be like for closeted gay hockey players. Nothing seemed fake.

I also enjoyed the awkward way the two characters come together in the beginning, which is really about as awkward as these things get in real life for most gay men. I kept thinking as I was reading that these are really many of the things I’ve experienced as a gay man, which kept me turning each page to see what would happen next. The topic of top and bottom was also a part of the book, which I don’t see as often as I would like in M/M romances. This top and bottom issue, for lack of a better way to put it, is something so fundamentally important to any intimate gay relationship it can either make or break a gay couple on the first date. And, the top and bottom issue has nothing to do with gender power or politics. It’s something innate to gay men sexually speaking and has nothing to do with how they behave when they are not in intimate situations. Carr scored highly here, too.

This book is also erotic romance. And the erotic scenes were not only excellent, but real. I found them sexy, well executed from a tech POV, and superior in detail with an individual style. And I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the way Carr wrote about Jason and Patrick acting as if they were sex maniacs at some points in the story. They do act that way, and any gay man knows why. Gay men don’t get a normal puberty like straight men. We are denied that and when we finally reach an age (that age varies with all gay men) where we realize we can act on our human sexual desires, we tend to over dramatize them both internally and externally to a certain extent. Half the time, just like the characters in this book I’m reviewing, we don’t even realize we are doing this.

The writing style of this book was neat and tight, without most of the usual issues I find horrifying in so many romance novels, gay or straight. The dialogue tags did not make me cringe, and the dialogue constantly moved the story forward. The only thing I noticed were a few too many similes, however, I’m not one of those readers who shun all similes. I “like” them and I don’t think they take the reader away from the story in this case at all. In fact, they add to the story in most cases. 

The ending was a little ambiguous, but the author has posted on Amazon that she will be writing a sequel to this book to tie things up. I don’t mind that. I like cliff hangers and I like knowing that I have something to which I can look forward. 

If I post this review on Amazon or Goodreads, I’ll give it five stars. If I were presumptuous enough to ever grade an author, I would give this book an A+. And I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in fiction that shows what it’s really like to be gay and closeted in a very straight, often unforgiving, world.

  

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